When it comes to assessing performance, business executives can be a lot like old-time baseball scouts, who have been around so long that they’ve developed a gut feel for which statistics matter most. But as Michael Lewis describes in Moneyball, the Oakland Athletics discovered that the metric the team’s scouts used to choose players had nothing to do with whether those players would score runs. They had been measuring the wrong thing, and executives may be making the same mistake.

Theory and empirical research show only a shaky connection between value creation and two of the most popular performance measures: earnings per share (EPS) growth and sales growth. Yet executives cling to those metrics because they are overconfident in their intuition, they misattribute the causes of events, and they do not escape the pull of the status quo.

The most useful statistics reliably reveal cause and effect. They have two defining characteristics: They are persistent, showing that the outcome of a given action at one time will be similar to the outcome of the same action at another time, and they are predictive —that is, there is a causal relationship between the action the statistic measures and the desired outcome.

We built Facebook to help people stay connected and bring us closer together with the people that matter to us. That's why we've always put friends and family at the core of the experience. Research shows that strengthening our relationships improves our well-being and happiness.

But recently we've gotten feedback from our community that public content -\-\ posts from businesses, brands and media -\-\ is crowding out the personal moments that lead us to connect more with each other.

It's easy to understand how we got here. Video and other public content have exploded on Facebook in the past couple of years. Since there's more public content than posts from your friends and family, the balance of what's in News Feed has shifted away from the most important thing Facebook can do -\-\ help us connect with each other.

When it comes to assessing performance, business executives can be a lot like old-time baseball scouts, who have been around so long that they’ve developed a gut feel for which statistics matter most. But as Michael Lewis describes in Moneyball, the Oakland Athletics discovered that the metric the team’s scouts used to choose players had nothing to do with whether those players would score runs. They had been measuring the wrong thing, and executives may be making the same mistake.

Theory and empirical research show only a shaky connection between value creation and two of the most popular performance measures: earnings per share (EPS) growth and sales growth. Yet executives cling to those metrics because they are overconfident in their intuition, they misattribute the causes of events, and they do not escape the pull of the status quo.

The most useful statistics reliably reveal cause and effect. They have two defining characteristics: They are persistent, showing that the outcome of a given action at one time will be similar to the outcome of the same action at another time, and they are predictive —that is, there is a causal relationship between the action the statistic measures and the desired outcome.

When it comes to assessing performance, business executives can be a lot like old-time baseball scouts, who have been around so long that they’ve developed a gut feel for which statistics matter most. But as Michael Lewis describes in Moneyball, the Oakland Athletics discovered that the metric the team’s scouts used to choose players had nothing to do with whether those players would score runs. They had been measuring the wrong thing, and executives may be making the same mistake.

Theory and empirical research show only a shaky connection between value creation and two of the most popular performance measures: earnings per share (EPS) growth and sales growth. Yet executives cling to those metrics because they are overconfident in their intuition, they misattribute the causes of events, and they do not escape the pull of the status quo.

The most useful statistics reliably reveal cause and effect. They have two defining characteristics: They are persistent, showing that the outcome of a given action at one time will be similar to the outcome of the same action at another time, and they are predictive —that is, there is a causal relationship between the action the statistic measures and the desired outcome.

We built Facebook to help people stay connected and bring us closer together with the people that matter to us. That's why we've always put friends and family at the core of the experience. Research shows that strengthening our relationships improves our well-being and happiness.

But recently we've gotten feedback from our community that public content -\-\ posts from businesses, brands and media -\-\ is crowding out the personal moments that lead us to connect more with each other.

It's easy to understand how we got here. Video and other public content have exploded on Facebook in the past couple of years. Since there's more public content than posts from your friends and family, the balance of what's in News Feed has shifted away from the most important thing Facebook can do -\-\ help us connect with each other.

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