The Epistulae Morales ad Lucilium ( Latin for "Moral Letters to Lucilius "), also known as the Moral Epistles , is a collection of 124 letters which were written by Seneca the Younger at the end of his life, during his retirement, and written after he had worked for the Emperor Nero for fifteen years. They are addressed to Lucilius , the then procurator of Sicily , although he is known only through Seneca's writings. Whether or not Seneca and Lucilius actually corresponded, scholars are largely of the opinion that Seneca created the work as a form of fiction. [1]

These letters all start with the phrase " Seneca Lucilio suo salutem " ("Seneca greets his Lucilius") and end with the word " Vale " ("Farewell"). In these letters, Seneca gives Lucilius advice on how to become a more devoted Stoic . Some of the letters include "On Noise" and "Asthma". Others include letters on "the influence of the masses" and "how to deal with one's slaves". Although they deal with Seneca's eclectic form of Stoic philosophy, they also give us valuable insights into daily life in ancient Rome.

Seneca also frequently quotes Publilius Syrus during the Epistles, such as during the eighth moral letter, "On the Philosopher's Seclusion". [3]

Selected from the Epistulae Morales ad Lucilium , Seneca's Letters from a Stoic are a set of 'essays in disguise' from one of the most insightful philosophers of the Silver Age of Roman literature. This Penguin Classics edition is translated from the Latin with an introduction by Robin Campbell.

Robin Campbell's lucid translation captures Seneca's humour and tautly aphoristic style. In his introduction, he discusses the tensions between Seneca's philosophy and his turbulent career as adviser to the tyrannical emperor Nero.

Lucius Annaeus Seneca (c.4BC - AD65) was born in Spain but was raised according to the traditional values of the republic of Rome. In AD48 he became tutor to the future emperor Nero and became his principal civil advisor when he took power. His death was eventually ordered by Nero in AD65, but Seneca anticipated the emperor's decree and committed suicide.

The Epistulae Morales ad Lucilium ( Latin for "Moral Letters to Lucilius "), also known as the Moral Epistles , is a collection of 124 letters which were written by Seneca the Younger at the end of his life, during his retirement, and written after he had worked for the Emperor Nero for fifteen years. They are addressed to Lucilius , the then procurator of Sicily , although he is known only through Seneca's writings. Whether or not Seneca and Lucilius actually corresponded, scholars are largely of the opinion that Seneca created the work as a form of fiction. [1]

These letters all start with the phrase " Seneca Lucilio suo salutem " ("Seneca greets his Lucilius") and end with the word " Vale " ("Farewell"). In these letters, Seneca gives Lucilius advice on how to become a more devoted Stoic . Some of the letters include "On Noise" and "Asthma". Others include letters on "the influence of the masses" and "how to deal with one's slaves". Although they deal with Seneca's eclectic form of Stoic philosophy, they also give us valuable insights into daily life in ancient Rome.

Seneca also frequently quotes Publilius Syrus during the Epistles, such as during the eighth moral letter, "On the Philosopher's Seclusion". [3]

Selected from the Epistulae Morales ad Lucilium , Seneca's Letters from a Stoic are a set of 'essays in disguise' from one of the most insightful philosophers of the Silver Age of Roman literature. This Penguin Classics edition is translated from the Latin with an introduction by Robin Campbell.

Robin Campbell's lucid translation captures Seneca's humour and tautly aphoristic style. In his introduction, he discusses the tensions between Seneca's philosophy and his turbulent career as adviser to the tyrannical emperor Nero.

Lucius Annaeus Seneca (c.4BC - AD65) was born in Spain but was raised according to the traditional values of the republic of Rome. In AD48 he became tutor to the future emperor Nero and became his principal civil advisor when he took power. His death was eventually ordered by Nero in AD65, but Seneca anticipated the emperor's decree and committed suicide.

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Lucius Annaeus Seneca  (c.4BC-AD65) was born in Cordoba, Spain, where he was brought up studying the traditional virtues of republican Roman life. He became a teacher of rhetoric but attracted attention for his incisive style of writing. Closely linked to Nero, his death was ordered by the emperor in AD65. Seneca committed suicide. 

Robin Campbell is a well-known translator.

The Epistulae Morales ad Lucilium ( Latin for "Moral Letters to Lucilius "), also known as the Moral Epistles , is a collection of 124 letters which were written by Seneca the Younger at the end of his life, during his retirement, and written after he had worked for the Emperor Nero for fifteen years. They are addressed to Lucilius , the then procurator of Sicily , although he is known only through Seneca's writings. Whether or not Seneca and Lucilius actually corresponded, scholars are largely of the opinion that Seneca created the work as a form of fiction. [1]

These letters all start with the phrase " Seneca Lucilio suo salutem " ("Seneca greets his Lucilius") and end with the word " Vale " ("Farewell"). In these letters, Seneca gives Lucilius advice on how to become a more devoted Stoic . Some of the letters include "On Noise" and "Asthma". Others include letters on "the influence of the masses" and "how to deal with one's slaves". Although they deal with Seneca's eclectic form of Stoic philosophy, they also give us valuable insights into daily life in ancient Rome.

Seneca also frequently quotes Publilius Syrus during the Epistles, such as during the eighth moral letter, "On the Philosopher's Seclusion". [3]


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