The site is set up for educational purposes. We respect copyright and give users the opportunity to get to know the world literature and communicate also. More details about us.

The first machine patented in the United States that showed animated pictures or movies was a device called the "wheel of life" or "zoopraxiscope." Patented in 1867 by William Lincoln, it allowed moving drawings or photographs to be viewed through a slit in the zoopraxiscope. However, this was a far cry from motion pictures as we know them today.

The Cinematographe made motion pictures very popular. It can even be said that Lumiere's invention gave birth to the motion picture era. In 1895, Lumiere and his brother became the first to demonstrate photographic moving pictures projected onto a screen for a paying audience of more than one person. The audience saw ten 50-second films, including the Lumière brother’s first, Sortie des Usines Lumière à Lyon ( Workers Leaving the Lumière Factory in Lyon ).

San Francisco photographer Eadweard Muybridge conducted motion-sequence still photographic experiments and is referred to as the "Father of the Motion Picture," even though he did not make films in the manner in which we know them today.

The site is set up for educational purposes. We respect copyright and give users the opportunity to get to know the world literature and communicate also. More details about us.

The site is set up for educational purposes. We respect copyright and give users the opportunity to get to know the world literature and communicate also. More details about us.

The first machine patented in the United States that showed animated pictures or movies was a device called the "wheel of life" or "zoopraxiscope." Patented in 1867 by William Lincoln, it allowed moving drawings or photographs to be viewed through a slit in the zoopraxiscope. However, this was a far cry from motion pictures as we know them today.

The Cinematographe made motion pictures very popular. It can even be said that Lumiere's invention gave birth to the motion picture era. In 1895, Lumiere and his brother became the first to demonstrate photographic moving pictures projected onto a screen for a paying audience of more than one person. The audience saw ten 50-second films, including the Lumière brother’s first, Sortie des Usines Lumière à Lyon ( Workers Leaving the Lumière Factory in Lyon ).

San Francisco photographer Eadweard Muybridge conducted motion-sequence still photographic experiments and is referred to as the "Father of the Motion Picture," even though he did not make films in the manner in which we know them today.

Cinema emerged in the late-nineteenth century through a combination of new advancements in technology with old traditions of screen presentation (see the Magic Lantern and Lantern Slide Catalog Collection for more on the history of these older technologies and screen practices).

Thanks to Domitor for supporting digitization of the early years of Moving Picture World and Marc Wanamaker, Eileen Bowser and the Museum of Modern Art for making rare copies available for scanning.

The site is set up for educational purposes. We respect copyright and give users the opportunity to get to know the world literature and communicate also. More details about us.

The first machine patented in the United States that showed animated pictures or movies was a device called the "wheel of life" or "zoopraxiscope." Patented in 1867 by William Lincoln, it allowed moving drawings or photographs to be viewed through a slit in the zoopraxiscope. However, this was a far cry from motion pictures as we know them today.

The Cinematographe made motion pictures very popular. It can even be said that Lumiere's invention gave birth to the motion picture era. In 1895, Lumiere and his brother became the first to demonstrate photographic moving pictures projected onto a screen for a paying audience of more than one person. The audience saw ten 50-second films, including the Lumière brother’s first, Sortie des Usines Lumière à Lyon ( Workers Leaving the Lumière Factory in Lyon ).

San Francisco photographer Eadweard Muybridge conducted motion-sequence still photographic experiments and is referred to as the "Father of the Motion Picture," even though he did not make films in the manner in which we know them today.

Cinema emerged in the late-nineteenth century through a combination of new advancements in technology with old traditions of screen presentation (see the Magic Lantern and Lantern Slide Catalog Collection for more on the history of these older technologies and screen practices).

Thanks to Domitor for supporting digitization of the early years of Moving Picture World and Marc Wanamaker, Eileen Bowser and the Museum of Modern Art for making rare copies available for scanning.

Roosevelt "is such an overmastering personality that we go the length of expressing the hope that moving pictures of him may be preserved in safe custody for future reference. What would the public of this country give today to see Abraham Lincoln or George Washington in their habits as they lived, in moving picture form? Don't you think the student, the historian, the biographer, the patriot would be glad to see moving pictures of these great men? ... It is the same with Mr. Roosevelt."

Although William McKinley was the first U.S. president to appear in a motion picture, Theodore Roosevelt was the first to have his career and life chronicled on a large scale by motion picture companies. Roosevelt courted the press and the media like no other president had before. He made such an impression on camera that the journal Moving Picture World referred to him as "more than a picture personality -- he is A PICTURE MAN."

The majority of the films on the site are from the Theodore Roosevelt Association Collection. Founded in 1919 after his death, the association was organized to perpetuate the legacy of Theodore Roosevelt. As part of its mission, it amassed a collection of motion pictures relating to the life and times of the former president. Much of the footage was taken from newsreels and other actuality films of the time. The association also compiled some of this footage to make silent documentaries on various aspects of Roosevelt's life, such as his trip on the River of Doubt in Brazil and the building of the Roosevelt Dam.


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