The living relationship with God, the Blessed Mother, the angels, the saints, the souls in Purgatory — with the entire supernatural world — was as equally real for her as was the world she perceived with her senses. In spite of being so richly endowed with extraordinary graces, Sr. Maria Faustina knew that they do not in fact constitute sanctity. In her Diary she wrote:

c.1300, "disclosure of information to man by a divine or supernatural agency," from Old French revelacion and directly from Latin revelationem (nominative revelatio ), noun of action from past participle stem of revelare "unveil, uncover, lay bare" (see reveal ). General meaning "disclosure of facts" is attested from late 14c.; meaning "striking disclosure" is from 1862. As the name of the last book of the New Testament ( Revelation of St. John ), it is first attested late 14c. (see apocalypse ); as simply Revelations , it is first recorded 1690s.

The living relationship with God, the Blessed Mother, the angels, the saints, the souls in Purgatory — with the entire supernatural world — was as equally real for her as was the world she perceived with her senses. In spite of being so richly endowed with extraordinary graces, Sr. Maria Faustina knew that they do not in fact constitute sanctity. In her Diary she wrote:

The living relationship with God, the Blessed Mother, the angels, the saints, the souls in Purgatory — with the entire supernatural world — was as equally real for her as was the world she perceived with her senses. In spite of being so richly endowed with extraordinary graces, Sr. Maria Faustina knew that they do not in fact constitute sanctity. In her Diary she wrote:

c.1300, "disclosure of information to man by a divine or supernatural agency," from Old French revelacion and directly from Latin revelationem (nominative revelatio ), noun of action from past participle stem of revelare "unveil, uncover, lay bare" (see reveal ). General meaning "disclosure of facts" is attested from late 14c.; meaning "striking disclosure" is from 1862. As the name of the last book of the New Testament ( Revelation of St. John ), it is first attested late 14c. (see apocalypse ); as simply Revelations , it is first recorded 1690s.

O n the night of 8 May 1373, a woman aged around 30 experienced 15 visions – or revelations, or, in the original Middle English, “shewings”, in which God’s love for humanity was made clear to her, through the person of Jesus. Among them: “And in this vision he also showed me a little thing, the size of a hazelnut, lying in the palm of my hand, as it seemed to me, and it was round as a ball. I looked at it with my mind’s eye and thought, ‘What can this be?’ And the answer came in a general way, like this: ‘It is all that is made.’”

One does not have to be a believer to appreciate this “shewing”. That the visions were the result of an illness so grave she was given the last rites (and for which she had prayed, so as to be “purged by the mercy of God”) can only have contributed to their intensity.

I have only one complaint, but it is a large one. Professor Windeatt has done a fine job of translating and annotating the work, but there is a case for a parallel text here: the original Middle English is not that difficult and it has a beauty that a modern idiom can’t fully reproduce. Take the passage quoted above. Here’s how it was first written: “In this same time our Lord shewed to me a ghostly sight of his homely loveing. He shewed a littil thing the quantitye of an hesil nutt in the palme of my hand, and it was as round as a balle. I lokid there upon with eye of my understondyng and thowte, What may this be? And it was generally answered thus: It is all that is made.”


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