Legend has it that the royal tombs of ancient Egypt were sealed with monstrous curses against all those who trespassed into the domain of the afterlife.

In the tomb of the boy pharaoh, Tutankhamun, hieroglyphs were said to have spelled out a dreadful end for all those who entered.

Howard Carter, the lead archaeologist who opened the tomb in 1923, wrote that "all sane people should dismiss such inventions with contempt".

Unfortunately for many people, the idea of magic denotes something negative, something scary, and something that could hurt them.

With measures like the evil eye, jinxes, and curses, you can make sure your life is safe and happy, without hurting anyone else.

The evil eye is a magical measure which helps to make sure no one is trying to harm you. This eye looks out from you or your home in the form of a magic spell or in a physical eye, watching out for any harmful energy or foes.  In looking out at the world, the evil eye will protect you or your home from any harm.  Some like to hang the eye of Horus in their home or above the front door of their house as a way to keep their family safe.  You might also want to find a piece of jewelry that has the eye of Horus to help carry the protection around with you wherever you go.

Curses after the Old Kingdom era are less common though more severe, sometimes invoking the ire of Thoth or the destruction of Sekhemet . [4] Zahi Hawass quotes an example of a curse: "Cursed be those who disturb the rest of a Pharaoh . They that shall break the seal of this tomb shall meet death by a disease that no doctor can diagnose." [5]

Hieroglyphs were not deciphered until the beginning of the 19th century by Jean-François Champollion , so reports of curses prior to this are simply perceived bad luck associated with the handling of mummies and other artifacts from tombs. In 1699, Louis Penicher wrote an account in which he recorded how a Polish traveler bought two mummies in Alexandria and embarked on a sea journey with the mummies in the cargo hold. The traveler was alarmed by recurring visions of two specters, and the stormy seas did not abate until the mummies were thrown overboard. [2]

Zahi Hawass recalled that as a young archaeologist excavating at Kom Abu-Bellou he had to transport a number of artifacts from the Greco-Roman site. His cousin died on that day, on its anniversary, his uncle died and on the third anniversary his aunt died. Years later, when he excavated the tombs of the builders of the pyramids at Giza, he encountered the curse: "All people who enter this tomb who will make evil against this tomb and destroy it may the crocodile be against them in water, and snakes against them on land. May the hippopotamus be against them in water, the scorpion against them on land." [5]

Legend has it that the royal tombs of ancient Egypt were sealed with monstrous curses against all those who trespassed into the domain of the afterlife.

In the tomb of the boy pharaoh, Tutankhamun, hieroglyphs were said to have spelled out a dreadful end for all those who entered.

Howard Carter, the lead archaeologist who opened the tomb in 1923, wrote that "all sane people should dismiss such inventions with contempt".

Legend has it that the royal tombs of ancient Egypt were sealed with monstrous curses against all those who trespassed into the domain of the afterlife.

In the tomb of the boy pharaoh, Tutankhamun, hieroglyphs were said to have spelled out a dreadful end for all those who entered.

Howard Carter, the lead archaeologist who opened the tomb in 1923, wrote that "all sane people should dismiss such inventions with contempt".

Unfortunately for many people, the idea of magic denotes something negative, something scary, and something that could hurt them.

With measures like the evil eye, jinxes, and curses, you can make sure your life is safe and happy, without hurting anyone else.

The evil eye is a magical measure which helps to make sure no one is trying to harm you. This eye looks out from you or your home in the form of a magic spell or in a physical eye, watching out for any harmful energy or foes.  In looking out at the world, the evil eye will protect you or your home from any harm.  Some like to hang the eye of Horus in their home or above the front door of their house as a way to keep their family safe.  You might also want to find a piece of jewelry that has the eye of Horus to help carry the protection around with you wherever you go.

Curses after the Old Kingdom era are less common though more severe, sometimes invoking the ire of Thoth or the destruction of Sekhemet . [4] Zahi Hawass quotes an example of a curse: "Cursed be those who disturb the rest of a Pharaoh . They that shall break the seal of this tomb shall meet death by a disease that no doctor can diagnose." [5]

Hieroglyphs were not deciphered until the beginning of the 19th century by Jean-François Champollion , so reports of curses prior to this are simply perceived bad luck associated with the handling of mummies and other artifacts from tombs. In 1699, Louis Penicher wrote an account in which he recorded how a Polish traveler bought two mummies in Alexandria and embarked on a sea journey with the mummies in the cargo hold. The traveler was alarmed by recurring visions of two specters, and the stormy seas did not abate until the mummies were thrown overboard. [2]

Zahi Hawass recalled that as a young archaeologist excavating at Kom Abu-Bellou he had to transport a number of artifacts from the Greco-Roman site. His cousin died on that day, on its anniversary, his uncle died and on the third anniversary his aunt died. Years later, when he excavated the tombs of the builders of the pyramids at Giza, he encountered the curse: "All people who enter this tomb who will make evil against this tomb and destroy it may the crocodile be against them in water, and snakes against them on land. May the hippopotamus be against them in water, the scorpion against them on land." [5]

The dining table is identifed with the creator Atum, and Pharaoh with his eldest son Shu, created from saliva. Atum produces food-stuffs; the king offers them back on the altar, and ultimately consumes them (temple procedure in miniature, known as reversion of offerings).

O table god, you have spat forth Shu from your mouth ... O table god, may he give to you all that he will have dedicated , since he has become a god who is an emanation, alert, worshipful and powerful. May he dedicate to you every good thing which you will give him, since he has become Heka. May he dedicate to you every good thing, food-offerings in abundance. May he set them before you and may you be content with them, may your spirit be content with them and may your heart be content with them forever....

Retranslated from: A. M. Blackman, "The King of Egypt's Grace before Meat," Journal of Egyptian Archaeology , vol. 31 (1945): 57-73.

Legend has it that the royal tombs of ancient Egypt were sealed with monstrous curses against all those who trespassed into the domain of the afterlife.

In the tomb of the boy pharaoh, Tutankhamun, hieroglyphs were said to have spelled out a dreadful end for all those who entered.

Howard Carter, the lead archaeologist who opened the tomb in 1923, wrote that "all sane people should dismiss such inventions with contempt".

Unfortunately for many people, the idea of magic denotes something negative, something scary, and something that could hurt them.

With measures like the evil eye, jinxes, and curses, you can make sure your life is safe and happy, without hurting anyone else.

The evil eye is a magical measure which helps to make sure no one is trying to harm you. This eye looks out from you or your home in the form of a magic spell or in a physical eye, watching out for any harmful energy or foes.  In looking out at the world, the evil eye will protect you or your home from any harm.  Some like to hang the eye of Horus in their home or above the front door of their house as a way to keep their family safe.  You might also want to find a piece of jewelry that has the eye of Horus to help carry the protection around with you wherever you go.

Curses after the Old Kingdom era are less common though more severe, sometimes invoking the ire of Thoth or the destruction of Sekhemet . [4] Zahi Hawass quotes an example of a curse: "Cursed be those who disturb the rest of a Pharaoh . They that shall break the seal of this tomb shall meet death by a disease that no doctor can diagnose." [5]

Hieroglyphs were not deciphered until the beginning of the 19th century by Jean-François Champollion , so reports of curses prior to this are simply perceived bad luck associated with the handling of mummies and other artifacts from tombs. In 1699, Louis Penicher wrote an account in which he recorded how a Polish traveler bought two mummies in Alexandria and embarked on a sea journey with the mummies in the cargo hold. The traveler was alarmed by recurring visions of two specters, and the stormy seas did not abate until the mummies were thrown overboard. [2]

Zahi Hawass recalled that as a young archaeologist excavating at Kom Abu-Bellou he had to transport a number of artifacts from the Greco-Roman site. His cousin died on that day, on its anniversary, his uncle died and on the third anniversary his aunt died. Years later, when he excavated the tombs of the builders of the pyramids at Giza, he encountered the curse: "All people who enter this tomb who will make evil against this tomb and destroy it may the crocodile be against them in water, and snakes against them on land. May the hippopotamus be against them in water, the scorpion against them on land." [5]

The dining table is identifed with the creator Atum, and Pharaoh with his eldest son Shu, created from saliva. Atum produces food-stuffs; the king offers them back on the altar, and ultimately consumes them (temple procedure in miniature, known as reversion of offerings).

O table god, you have spat forth Shu from your mouth ... O table god, may he give to you all that he will have dedicated , since he has become a god who is an emanation, alert, worshipful and powerful. May he dedicate to you every good thing which you will give him, since he has become Heka. May he dedicate to you every good thing, food-offerings in abundance. May he set them before you and may you be content with them, may your spirit be content with them and may your heart be content with them forever....

Retranslated from: A. M. Blackman, "The King of Egypt's Grace before Meat," Journal of Egyptian Archaeology , vol. 31 (1945): 57-73.

Curses are as old as mankind. For millennia, people have wished misfortune on their enemies, often in the form of pleas to supernatural and divine forces. With elaborate rituals, prayers, and language, curse casting has often been a profession. Objects can also hold curses—especially human remains.

In 1986, archaeologists unearthed a curse tablet during excavations of the ancient Macedonian capital of Pella. Created between 375 and 350 BC, the Pella tablet is an inscribed lead scroll. The writer, Dagina, calls upon divine powers to solve her problem: Her beloved, Dionysophon, is on the precipice of marriage to another woman. Dagina wants him for herself and beseeches the gods for assistance in love .

The language on the stone is far removed from the stately language of the ancient Macedonian court, so linguists believe that Dagina was of a lower social stratum. The tablet has confirmed their suspicions that her Macedonian vernacular derived from Doric Greek.

Legend has it that the royal tombs of ancient Egypt were sealed with monstrous curses against all those who trespassed into the domain of the afterlife.

In the tomb of the boy pharaoh, Tutankhamun, hieroglyphs were said to have spelled out a dreadful end for all those who entered.

Howard Carter, the lead archaeologist who opened the tomb in 1923, wrote that "all sane people should dismiss such inventions with contempt".

Unfortunately for many people, the idea of magic denotes something negative, something scary, and something that could hurt them.

With measures like the evil eye, jinxes, and curses, you can make sure your life is safe and happy, without hurting anyone else.

The evil eye is a magical measure which helps to make sure no one is trying to harm you. This eye looks out from you or your home in the form of a magic spell or in a physical eye, watching out for any harmful energy or foes.  In looking out at the world, the evil eye will protect you or your home from any harm.  Some like to hang the eye of Horus in their home or above the front door of their house as a way to keep their family safe.  You might also want to find a piece of jewelry that has the eye of Horus to help carry the protection around with you wherever you go.


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