Weave-It Looms™ were available in four main types: 4” square, 2” square, 5” rug loom and the 4” bias loom. The 4” and 2” were first made in wood and later in plastic. (The 4” was also made in Catalin for a brief time.) The bias loom was made of wood with metal pins. The rug loom was wood, with wood “pins”.

My favorite of all hand-held looms is the 5” Weave-It Rug Loom on which I can weave with bulky handspun yarns, fabric strips, raffia, ribbon, etc. Squares made with this loom take no time at all and are quickly assembled. If you're handy, here's a site that will help you make your own loom: http://www.rogersstark.com/wool/weave/weave.htm .

Weave-It standard 4” and 2” looms in plastic are what I use the most—easy to carry, easy to replace if lost or broken (eBay), and easiest to use. The plastic versions of these looms have pins with smooth, rounded tips and that makes a difference to your fingers when weaving hundreds of squares.

The De Luxe Catalin 4” looms are beautiful and warm to touch, but fragile. These came in a sweet little box–called “airplane luggage”.

Weaving remained unchanged for hundreds of years until John Kay devised the flying shuttle , which enabled a weaver to knock the shuttle across the loom and back again using one hand only. The speed of weaving was doubled; and a single weaver could make cloths of any width, whereas previously two men had sat together at a loom to make broad cloth. By 1800 it was estimated that there were 250,000 handlooms in Britain. (3)

Weave-It Looms™ were available in four main types: 4” square, 2” square, 5” rug loom and the 4” bias loom. The 4” and 2” were first made in wood and later in plastic. (The 4” was also made in Catalin for a brief time.) The bias loom was made of wood with metal pins. The rug loom was wood, with wood “pins”.

My favorite of all hand-held looms is the 5” Weave-It Rug Loom on which I can weave with bulky handspun yarns, fabric strips, raffia, ribbon, etc. Squares made with this loom take no time at all and are quickly assembled. If you're handy, here's a site that will help you make your own loom: http://www.rogersstark.com/wool/weave/weave.htm .

Weave-It standard 4” and 2” looms in plastic are what I use the most—easy to carry, easy to replace if lost or broken (eBay), and easiest to use. The plastic versions of these looms have pins with smooth, rounded tips and that makes a difference to your fingers when weaving hundreds of squares.

The De Luxe Catalin 4” looms are beautiful and warm to touch, but fragile. These came in a sweet little box–called “airplane luggage”.

Weaving remained unchanged for hundreds of years until John Kay devised the flying shuttle , which enabled a weaver to knock the shuttle across the loom and back again using one hand only. The speed of weaving was doubled; and a single weaver could make cloths of any width, whereas previously two men had sat together at a loom to make broad cloth. By 1800 it was estimated that there were 250,000 handlooms in Britain. (3)

Weaving Hand is a Brooklyn based weaving studio and healing arts center. We celebrate a fusion of traditional and contemporary weaving techniques with our studio classes, workshops, commissions, outreach programs and exhibitions all while embracing sustainable and ethical practices. 

As a healing arts center, Weaving Hand uses weaving as a creative tool to enhance developmental programs for adults and children with intellectual, emotional and physical disabilities. 

We value the evolving teachings and conversations surrounding this rich art form. We continually expand our knowledge by collaborating locally as well as internationally with weavers in Asia, Central and South America, Africa and Europe.

Weave-It Looms™ were available in four main types: 4” square, 2” square, 5” rug loom and the 4” bias loom. The 4” and 2” were first made in wood and later in plastic. (The 4” was also made in Catalin for a brief time.) The bias loom was made of wood with metal pins. The rug loom was wood, with wood “pins”.

My favorite of all hand-held looms is the 5” Weave-It Rug Loom on which I can weave with bulky handspun yarns, fabric strips, raffia, ribbon, etc. Squares made with this loom take no time at all and are quickly assembled. If you're handy, here's a site that will help you make your own loom: http://www.rogersstark.com/wool/weave/weave.htm .

Weave-It standard 4” and 2” looms in plastic are what I use the most—easy to carry, easy to replace if lost or broken (eBay), and easiest to use. The plastic versions of these looms have pins with smooth, rounded tips and that makes a difference to your fingers when weaving hundreds of squares.

The De Luxe Catalin 4” looms are beautiful and warm to touch, but fragile. These came in a sweet little box–called “airplane luggage”.


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