From teleportation and space elevators to alien contact and interstellar travel, science fiction and fantasy writers have come up with some brilliant and innovative ideas. Yet how plausible are these ideas—for instance, could Mr. Weasley’s flying car in the Harry Potter books really exist? Which concepts might actually happen, and which ones wouldn’t work at all? Wizards, Aliens, and Starships delves into the most extraordinary details in science fiction and fantasy—such as time warps, shape changing, rocket launches, and illumination by floating candle—and shows readers the physics and math behind the phenomena.

Wizards, Aliens, and Starships will speak to anyone wanting to know about the correct—and incorrect—science of science fiction and fantasy.

A bit like using every part of the chicken, cash-strapped cable networks have become much more aggressive about picking up international productions to augment their original programming lineups. Enter little-seen children’s network The Hub and “Wizards vs. Aliens ,” an utterly nostalgic step into the cheesy kids way-back machine, produced under the loving eyes of “Dr. Who’s” Russell T. Davies and Phil Ford. Simple but fun, this half-hour adventure isn’t much more complicated than its title, but it’s the kind of thing that should amuse an eight year old, and make adults of a certain age feel eight all over again.

Taking a page from the “Harry Potter” treasure trove, the show features a teenage wizard, Tom (Scott Haran), who with his non-believing buddy Benny (Percelle Ascott) must try to save the world from aliens known as the Nekross, who have come to drain Earth of its magic. The invaders have a couple of extra eyes perched on what look like antenna, and one of them is played by Gwendoline Christie , currently making an impression on U.S. audiences in “Game of Thrones.”

As with many early U.S. stabs at live-action children’s fare, the slipshod nature of some special effects (aside from the made-up bipeds, one key alien resembles a giant Muppet) actually work to the show’s advantage. So does the half-hour format, which (in the two-part premiere) doesn’t leave much time for anything but lurching from one crisis to the next, while the alien leader (voiced by Brian Blessed) bellows things like, “The Nekross shall feast!”

From teleportation and space elevators to alien contact and interstellar travel, science fiction and fantasy writers have come up with some brilliant and innovative ideas. Yet how plausible are these ideas—for instance, could Mr. Weasley’s flying car in the Harry Potter books really exist? Which concepts might actually happen, and which ones wouldn’t work at all? Wizards, Aliens, and Starships delves into the most extraordinary details in science fiction and fantasy—such as time warps, shape changing, rocket launches, and illumination by floating candle—and shows readers the physics and math behind the phenomena.

Wizards, Aliens, and Starships will speak to anyone wanting to know about the correct—and incorrect—science of science fiction and fantasy.


bookmarkyourlink.info
51nNV+5VQpL