Wonder what Christopher thought of this one?  According to imdb, it was groundbreaking at the time...for Finland anyway.

OK, we've been here almost a year and there's NOT a Tolkien thread? I could've sworn there was one, but after using the search function several times over, nothing popped up.

www.amazon.com/Beren-L%C3%BAthien-J-R-R-Tolkien/dp/1328791823/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1477918602&sr=1-1&keywords=beren+%26+luthien

Wonder what Christopher thought of this one?  According to imdb, it was groundbreaking at the time...for Finland anyway.

OK, we've been here almost a year and there's NOT a Tolkien thread? I could've sworn there was one, but after using the search function several times over, nothing popped up.

www.amazon.com/Beren-L%C3%BAthien-J-R-R-Tolkien/dp/1328791823/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1477918602&sr=1-1&keywords=beren+%26+luthien

This article, and others about one of the most celebrated writers, is featured in Newsweek's Special Edition: J.R.R. Tolkien—The Mind of a Genius.

Scholars, academics and casual enthusiasts have spilled tons of ink (both of the real and virtual varieties) about the exact definition of fantasy (does an epic poem such as Beowulf count?) and the genre’s origins (do Greek myths qualify? Romantic poems from the Middle Ages?). But the overwhelming influence of J.R.R. Tolkien on the genre remains a fundamental certainty. The British author didn’t invent fantasy, but he defined it in the minds of millions with his seminal works The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings .

Tolkien’s first mark on the genre came with the publication of The Hobbit in 1937. Although shorter and more light-hearted than its epic big brother The Lord of the Rings , Tolkien’s first novel casts a long shadow of its own, redefining the idea of children’s fantasy.

John Ronald Reuel Tolkien , CBE FRSL ( UK : / ˈ t ɒ l k iː n / ; [a] 3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English writer, poet, philologist , and university professor who is best known as the author of the classic high-fantasy works The Hobbit , The Lord of the Rings , and The Silmarillion .

He served as the Rawlinson and Bosworth Professor of Anglo-Saxon and Fellow of Pembroke College, Oxford , from 1925 to 1945 and Merton Professor of English Language and Literature and Fellow of Merton College, Oxford , from 1945 to 1959. [1] He was at one time a close friend of C. S. Lewis —they were both members of the informal literary discussion group known as the Inklings . Tolkien was appointed a Commander of the Order of the British Empire by Queen Elizabeth II on 28 March 1972.

After Tolkien's death, his son Christopher published a series of works based on his father's extensive notes and unpublished manuscripts, including The Silmarillion . These, together with The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings , form a connected body of tales, poems, fictional histories, invented languages, and literary essays about a fantasy world called Arda and Middle-earth [b] within it. Between 1951 and 1955, Tolkien applied the term legendarium to the larger part of these writings. [2]

The Father Christmas Letters by J.R.R. Tolkien (alternate title: Letters from Father Christmas ) is a delightful volume for personal or family reading during the Christmas season. With Tolkien’s skillful storytelling abilities and charming illustrations, the book can quickly become a holiday favorite. In this post we will explore some of the historical context for the letters and provide a brief overview of the book.

Several editions of The Father Christmas Letters have been published over the years, and a few of those are shown here. The most complete collection to date is the HarperCollins 1999 edition (blue cover above) with a cover depiction of Polar Bear after toppling down the staircase with a trail of crushed gifts in his wake. Variant editions with a unique aesthetic appeal include the HarperCollins 1994 edition consisting of three miniature volumes in a boxed set; and the CollinsChildren’sBooks / Houghton Mifflin 1995 edition, featuring facsimile envelopes with individual letters to pull out and read.

Whichever edition finds its way to your home, the Wade Center recommends sharing it with loved ones and having a ready supply of hot cocoa to accompany the reading sessions. We’ll let Father Christmas have the last word:

Wonder what Christopher thought of this one?  According to imdb, it was groundbreaking at the time...for Finland anyway.

OK, we've been here almost a year and there's NOT a Tolkien thread? I could've sworn there was one, but after using the search function several times over, nothing popped up.

www.amazon.com/Beren-L%C3%BAthien-J-R-R-Tolkien/dp/1328791823/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1477918602&sr=1-1&keywords=beren+%26+luthien

This article, and others about one of the most celebrated writers, is featured in Newsweek's Special Edition: J.R.R. Tolkien—The Mind of a Genius.

Scholars, academics and casual enthusiasts have spilled tons of ink (both of the real and virtual varieties) about the exact definition of fantasy (does an epic poem such as Beowulf count?) and the genre’s origins (do Greek myths qualify? Romantic poems from the Middle Ages?). But the overwhelming influence of J.R.R. Tolkien on the genre remains a fundamental certainty. The British author didn’t invent fantasy, but he defined it in the minds of millions with his seminal works The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings .

Tolkien’s first mark on the genre came with the publication of The Hobbit in 1937. Although shorter and more light-hearted than its epic big brother The Lord of the Rings , Tolkien’s first novel casts a long shadow of its own, redefining the idea of children’s fantasy.

Wonder what Christopher thought of this one?  According to imdb, it was groundbreaking at the time...for Finland anyway.

OK, we've been here almost a year and there's NOT a Tolkien thread? I could've sworn there was one, but after using the search function several times over, nothing popped up.

www.amazon.com/Beren-L%C3%BAthien-J-R-R-Tolkien/dp/1328791823/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1477918602&sr=1-1&keywords=beren+%26+luthien

This article, and others about one of the most celebrated writers, is featured in Newsweek's Special Edition: J.R.R. Tolkien—The Mind of a Genius.

Scholars, academics and casual enthusiasts have spilled tons of ink (both of the real and virtual varieties) about the exact definition of fantasy (does an epic poem such as Beowulf count?) and the genre’s origins (do Greek myths qualify? Romantic poems from the Middle Ages?). But the overwhelming influence of J.R.R. Tolkien on the genre remains a fundamental certainty. The British author didn’t invent fantasy, but he defined it in the minds of millions with his seminal works The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings .

Tolkien’s first mark on the genre came with the publication of The Hobbit in 1937. Although shorter and more light-hearted than its epic big brother The Lord of the Rings , Tolkien’s first novel casts a long shadow of its own, redefining the idea of children’s fantasy.

John Ronald Reuel Tolkien , CBE FRSL ( UK : / ˈ t ɒ l k iː n / ; [a] 3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English writer, poet, philologist , and university professor who is best known as the author of the classic high-fantasy works The Hobbit , The Lord of the Rings , and The Silmarillion .

He served as the Rawlinson and Bosworth Professor of Anglo-Saxon and Fellow of Pembroke College, Oxford , from 1925 to 1945 and Merton Professor of English Language and Literature and Fellow of Merton College, Oxford , from 1945 to 1959. [1] He was at one time a close friend of C. S. Lewis —they were both members of the informal literary discussion group known as the Inklings . Tolkien was appointed a Commander of the Order of the British Empire by Queen Elizabeth II on 28 March 1972.

After Tolkien's death, his son Christopher published a series of works based on his father's extensive notes and unpublished manuscripts, including The Silmarillion . These, together with The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings , form a connected body of tales, poems, fictional histories, invented languages, and literary essays about a fantasy world called Arda and Middle-earth [b] within it. Between 1951 and 1955, Tolkien applied the term legendarium to the larger part of these writings. [2]


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