The bolt of lightning ignited the plant and a nearby pond creating a rare weather phenomenon known as a fire tornado (but “firenado” sounds way cooler).

No word what type of bourbon was being brewed, but I’m going with the Devil’s Cut just because it would be even better.

A lake brimming with bourbon becomes the nesting ground for a firenado, after a lightning strike destroys a Jim Beam warehouse. Watch, as the whirl *really* gets going 20 seconds into the video. (Don’t forget to unmute the video to hear the story.)

There were some who said it shouldn’t happen, who warned me, plainly, that when you hear the first distant boom of thunder at the public pool you have to get out for at least a half hour.

But this was no Sunday afternoon swim: this was the Fourth Annual River Baptism and there were twelve people lined up on the river bank ready to be “buried with Christ in a baptism like his” as Paul puts it.  That word, buried, seemed eerily appropriate as I waded out into the James River a little after five with the skies darkening to the west.  And just as the second hymn ended I heard it–the distant boom of thunder.

I motioned for Ralph Starling to assist me in the water.  He gulped hard and waded out.  And then the first candidate came, the one who had been so eager about her baptism day.  Neither rain, nor snow, nor sleet, nor hail was going to stop her from taking the plunge.  She came up out of the water triumphant, with a shout and a raised fist.  The others seemed just as determined, even when lightning flashed in the distance, even when the skies opened up briefly and the rain poured down.

Uploaded by Lum Edwards on February 3, 2011

Caviezel was born in Mount Vernon, Washington , the son of Margaret (née Lavery), a former stage actress and housewife, and James Caviezel, a chiropractor . [2] [3] He has a younger brother, Timothy, and three sisters, Ann, Amy, and Erin. He was raised in a tightly-knit Catholic family in Conway, Washington . [4] [5] His surname is Romansh . His father is of Slovak and Swiss descent, while his mother is of Irish descent. [6] [7] His father attended UCLA and played basketball for coach John Wooden , prompting all the Caviezel siblings to play the sport. [8]

Caviezel was originally cast to play Scott Summers / Cyclops in X-Men (2000), but dropped out because of a scheduling conflict with the film Frequency (2000). He starred in the mainstream films Pay It Forward (2000), The Count of Monte Cristo (2002), and Bobby Jones: Stroke of Genius (2004). In 2000, he played the lead role in Madison , a film about hydroplane racing in Madison, Indiana . The film was completed in 2001, but did not appear in theaters until a limited release in 2005. In 2002, he played a pivotal role in the film I Am David .

Caviezel portrayed Jesus Christ in Mel Gibson 's 2004 film The Passion of the Christ . During filming, he was struck by lightning, accidentally scourged, had his shoulder dislocated , and suffered from pneumonia and hypothermia . [11] Prior to filming, Gibson reportedly warned Caviezel that playing Jesus would hurt his acting career. In 2011, he admitted that good roles had been hard to come by since, but stated he had no regrets about taking the role. [12] [13]

The bolt of lightning ignited the plant and a nearby pond creating a rare weather phenomenon known as a fire tornado (but “firenado” sounds way cooler).

No word what type of bourbon was being brewed, but I’m going with the Devil’s Cut just because it would be even better.

A lake brimming with bourbon becomes the nesting ground for a firenado, after a lightning strike destroys a Jim Beam warehouse. Watch, as the whirl *really* gets going 20 seconds into the video. (Don’t forget to unmute the video to hear the story.)

There were some who said it shouldn’t happen, who warned me, plainly, that when you hear the first distant boom of thunder at the public pool you have to get out for at least a half hour.

But this was no Sunday afternoon swim: this was the Fourth Annual River Baptism and there were twelve people lined up on the river bank ready to be “buried with Christ in a baptism like his” as Paul puts it.  That word, buried, seemed eerily appropriate as I waded out into the James River a little after five with the skies darkening to the west.  And just as the second hymn ended I heard it–the distant boom of thunder.

I motioned for Ralph Starling to assist me in the water.  He gulped hard and waded out.  And then the first candidate came, the one who had been so eager about her baptism day.  Neither rain, nor snow, nor sleet, nor hail was going to stop her from taking the plunge.  She came up out of the water triumphant, with a shout and a raised fist.  The others seemed just as determined, even when lightning flashed in the distance, even when the skies opened up briefly and the rain poured down.

Uploaded by Lum Edwards on February 3, 2011

The bolt of lightning ignited the plant and a nearby pond creating a rare weather phenomenon known as a fire tornado (but “firenado” sounds way cooler).

No word what type of bourbon was being brewed, but I’m going with the Devil’s Cut just because it would be even better.

A lake brimming with bourbon becomes the nesting ground for a firenado, after a lightning strike destroys a Jim Beam warehouse. Watch, as the whirl *really* gets going 20 seconds into the video. (Don’t forget to unmute the video to hear the story.)

The bolt of lightning ignited the plant and a nearby pond creating a rare weather phenomenon known as a fire tornado (but “firenado” sounds way cooler).

No word what type of bourbon was being brewed, but I’m going with the Devil’s Cut just because it would be even better.

A lake brimming with bourbon becomes the nesting ground for a firenado, after a lightning strike destroys a Jim Beam warehouse. Watch, as the whirl *really* gets going 20 seconds into the video. (Don’t forget to unmute the video to hear the story.)

There were some who said it shouldn’t happen, who warned me, plainly, that when you hear the first distant boom of thunder at the public pool you have to get out for at least a half hour.

But this was no Sunday afternoon swim: this was the Fourth Annual River Baptism and there were twelve people lined up on the river bank ready to be “buried with Christ in a baptism like his” as Paul puts it.  That word, buried, seemed eerily appropriate as I waded out into the James River a little after five with the skies darkening to the west.  And just as the second hymn ended I heard it–the distant boom of thunder.

I motioned for Ralph Starling to assist me in the water.  He gulped hard and waded out.  And then the first candidate came, the one who had been so eager about her baptism day.  Neither rain, nor snow, nor sleet, nor hail was going to stop her from taking the plunge.  She came up out of the water triumphant, with a shout and a raised fist.  The others seemed just as determined, even when lightning flashed in the distance, even when the skies opened up briefly and the rain poured down.


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