Based on a 2007 online poll, the U.S. National Education Association named the book one of its "Teachers' Top 100 Books for Children". [5] In 2012 it was ranked number 56 among all-time children's novels in a survey published by School Library Journal , a monthly with primarily U.S. audience. [6] It was the second of two Burnett novels among the Top 100, with The Secret Garden number 15. [6]

Despite her privilege, Sara is neither arrogant nor snobbish, but rather kind, generous and clever. She extends her friendship to Ermengarde, the school dunce , to Lottie, a four-year-old student given to tantrums, and to Becky, the lowly, stunted fourteen-year-old scullery maid . When Sara acquires the epithet of a princess, she embraces its favorable elements in her natural goodheartedness.

Sara invites Becky to live with her and be her personal maid, in much better living conditions than at Miss Minchin's. Carrisford becomes a second father to Sara and quickly regains his health. Finally, Sara — accompanied by Becky — pays a visit to the bakery where she bought the buns, making a deal with the owner to cover the bills for bread for any hungry child. They find that the beggar girl who was saved from starvation by Sara's selfless act is now the bakery owner's assistant, with good food, clothing, shelter, and steady employment.

Sarah ( Mirai Shida ) studies at a prestigious all female high school. Her father was extremely rich but dies after the collapse of his business. Because of this, Sarah moves from the student dormitory to the staff quarters and begins to work for the school. Sarah then faces a lot of hardship, as her former jealous classmates and principal tries to make her life as difficult as possible. Through all of this, Sarah attempts to stay cheerful and positive.

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Based on a 2007 online poll, the U.S. National Education Association named the book one of its "Teachers' Top 100 Books for Children". [5] In 2012 it was ranked number 56 among all-time children's novels in a survey published by School Library Journal , a monthly with primarily U.S. audience. [6] It was the second of two Burnett novels among the Top 100, with The Secret Garden number 15. [6]

Despite her privilege, Sara is neither arrogant nor snobbish, but rather kind, generous and clever. She extends her friendship to Ermengarde, the school dunce , to Lottie, a four-year-old student given to tantrums, and to Becky, the lowly, stunted fourteen-year-old scullery maid . When Sara acquires the epithet of a princess, she embraces its favorable elements in her natural goodheartedness.

Sara invites Becky to live with her and be her personal maid, in much better living conditions than at Miss Minchin's. Carrisford becomes a second father to Sara and quickly regains his health. Finally, Sara — accompanied by Becky — pays a visit to the bakery where she bought the buns, making a deal with the owner to cover the bills for bread for any hungry child. They find that the beggar girl who was saved from starvation by Sara's selfless act is now the bakery owner's assistant, with good food, clothing, shelter, and steady employment.


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