Uploaded by associate-adrianna-flores on November 7, 2013

Uploaded by associate-adrianna-flores on November 7, 2013

Before Robert Frost became Robert Frost, he was a chicken farmer. In 1899, at the age of twenty-five, he rented half a farmhouse for himself, his wife, his first two children, and several dozen Wyandottes. He soon ran out of room and moved to a larger farm in New Hampshire, where the local newspaper reported that "R. Frost has moved upon the Magoon place which he recently bought. He has a flock of nearly 300 Wyandotte fowls."

During the day Frost did what all chicken farmers do:  he repaired coops, built fences, scattered grain, gathered eggs, and sold live birds to butchers for meat. He read poultry magazines, consulted with breeders, followed the market prices in the newspaper, and attended poultry shows.  And at night, he wrote poetry.

The poetry wasn't exactly a hot seller:  he'd sold one poem a few years earlier and, emboldened by his success, proposed to his future wife.  She turned him down the first time, perhaps feeling that he ought to find a more stable occupation (like chicken farming) before she accepted.

Uploaded by associate-adrianna-flores on November 7, 2013

Before Robert Frost became Robert Frost, he was a chicken farmer. In 1899, at the age of twenty-five, he rented half a farmhouse for himself, his wife, his first two children, and several dozen Wyandottes. He soon ran out of room and moved to a larger farm in New Hampshire, where the local newspaper reported that "R. Frost has moved upon the Magoon place which he recently bought. He has a flock of nearly 300 Wyandotte fowls."

During the day Frost did what all chicken farmers do:  he repaired coops, built fences, scattered grain, gathered eggs, and sold live birds to butchers for meat. He read poultry magazines, consulted with breeders, followed the market prices in the newspaper, and attended poultry shows.  And at night, he wrote poetry.

The poetry wasn't exactly a hot seller:  he'd sold one poem a few years earlier and, emboldened by his success, proposed to his future wife.  She turned him down the first time, perhaps feeling that he ought to find a more stable occupation (like chicken farming) before she accepted.

Fred Beeson (1932-1980)
Fred Beeson was born in England in 1901 and his love of poultry started when he was 15, during the First World War, when, no doubt, his family produced food to supplement the limited rations available.


By 1925, Beeson was in Canada, working for the Alberta Poultry Branch until he moved to British Columbia in 1928. There he bought and lost money operating a breeder farm on Vancouver Island, then worked for a mainland-B.C. leghorn breeder for a year.


He joined the staff of Canada Poultryman in 1931 as an advertising salesman, then bought the magazine for $1 and took over as editor in 1932, rather than let the magazine fold during the Depression. During that time he often used the dollar taken for a new subscription to pay for his expenses on the road. He lived on a one-acre lot in what is now an upscale neighbourhood in Burnaby and produced the magazine from the basement. The April 1932 issue grossed $236.04 with a full-page ad costing $30.

Uploaded by associate-adrianna-flores on November 7, 2013

Before Robert Frost became Robert Frost, he was a chicken farmer. In 1899, at the age of twenty-five, he rented half a farmhouse for himself, his wife, his first two children, and several dozen Wyandottes. He soon ran out of room and moved to a larger farm in New Hampshire, where the local newspaper reported that "R. Frost has moved upon the Magoon place which he recently bought. He has a flock of nearly 300 Wyandotte fowls."

During the day Frost did what all chicken farmers do:  he repaired coops, built fences, scattered grain, gathered eggs, and sold live birds to butchers for meat. He read poultry magazines, consulted with breeders, followed the market prices in the newspaper, and attended poultry shows.  And at night, he wrote poetry.

The poetry wasn't exactly a hot seller:  he'd sold one poem a few years earlier and, emboldened by his success, proposed to his future wife.  She turned him down the first time, perhaps feeling that he ought to find a more stable occupation (like chicken farming) before she accepted.

Fred Beeson (1932-1980)
Fred Beeson was born in England in 1901 and his love of poultry started when he was 15, during the First World War, when, no doubt, his family produced food to supplement the limited rations available.


By 1925, Beeson was in Canada, working for the Alberta Poultry Branch until he moved to British Columbia in 1928. There he bought and lost money operating a breeder farm on Vancouver Island, then worked for a mainland-B.C. leghorn breeder for a year.


He joined the staff of Canada Poultryman in 1931 as an advertising salesman, then bought the magazine for $1 and took over as editor in 1932, rather than let the magazine fold during the Depression. During that time he often used the dollar taken for a new subscription to pay for his expenses on the road. He lived on a one-acre lot in what is now an upscale neighbourhood in Burnaby and produced the magazine from the basement. The April 1932 issue grossed $236.04 with a full-page ad costing $30.

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