The clock is ticking: If you're over age 70 1/2 and have not yet taken required minimum distributions from your traditional retirement accounts, you only have until the end of the year to do so.

For some investors, taking RMDs is a necessity; they need the dollars to help cover their expenses. But for others who don't need their RMDs to get by, these forced withdrawals often seem like a nuisance.

"Affluent investors love to hate their RMDs," says Morningstar director of personal finance Christine Benz. "They complain that their RMDs push them into a higher tax bracket and muck with their planned withdrawal rates. They wonder about how to reinvest their unwanted, unneeded distributions, as well as how to avoid RMDs in the first place."

In his annual letter to Berkshire Hathaway shareholders, Warren Buffett makes the case for doing less and sticking to the fundamentals of investing.

We take a numerical look through this week's Morningstar research. Plus, our most popular articles and videos for the week ended Feb. 23.

We check in on the auto industry, share tips for fighting inflation, and offer funds for a sustainable portfolio in this week's Investing Insights podcast.

The clock is ticking: If you're over age 70 1/2 and have not yet taken required minimum distributions from your traditional retirement accounts, you only have until the end of the year to do so.

For some investors, taking RMDs is a necessity; they need the dollars to help cover their expenses. But for others who don't need their RMDs to get by, these forced withdrawals often seem like a nuisance.

"Affluent investors love to hate their RMDs," says Morningstar director of personal finance Christine Benz. "They complain that their RMDs push them into a higher tax bracket and muck with their planned withdrawal rates. They wonder about how to reinvest their unwanted, unneeded distributions, as well as how to avoid RMDs in the first place."

The clock is ticking: If you're over age 70 1/2 and have not yet taken required minimum distributions from your traditional retirement accounts, you only have until the end of the year to do so.

For some investors, taking RMDs is a necessity; they need the dollars to help cover their expenses. But for others who don't need their RMDs to get by, these forced withdrawals often seem like a nuisance.

"Affluent investors love to hate their RMDs," says Morningstar director of personal finance Christine Benz. "They complain that their RMDs push them into a higher tax bracket and muck with their planned withdrawal rates. They wonder about how to reinvest their unwanted, unneeded distributions, as well as how to avoid RMDs in the first place."

In his annual letter to Berkshire Hathaway shareholders, Warren Buffett makes the case for doing less and sticking to the fundamentals of investing.

We take a numerical look through this week's Morningstar research. Plus, our most popular articles and videos for the week ended Feb. 23.

We check in on the auto industry, share tips for fighting inflation, and offer funds for a sustainable portfolio in this week's Investing Insights podcast.

To help you decide whether the time is right for Senior Living, particularly Assisted Living, we offer this decision guide. Retirement options are brighter and wider than ever before in history. Yet all those choices can sometimes just lead to confusion. So our first advice is to clearly identify what you’re trying to solve, with an eye not just to next year, but to the next 5-10 years.

Assisted Living is a relatively new idea. In the late 1990s, our culture realized that the town “nursing home” was often a dour choice. Institutional. Depressing. No real home at all.

We also realized many seniors didn’t require a nurse—just a little help with daily living. And as our nation’s treasures, they certainly deserved not just to survive, but to thrive amid fine dining, libraries, fitness centers and creative programs. Built on a European social model, Assisted Living is a new paradigm in wellness and engagement.


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