In physics, resonance is a phenomenon in which a vibrating system or external force drives another system to oscillate with greater amplitude at specific frequencies.

Another common physics demonstration that serves as an excellent model of resonance is the famous "singing rod" demonstration. A long hollow aluminum rod is held at ...

The physics of resonance: Specially designed for high school students to explain one of the most impressive phenomena in all of physics

Magnetic-resonance measurements of electron spins are starting to bump up against quantum limits, in which the noise level is dominated by quantum fluctuations in the microwave probe pulses. To go further in sensitivity, Audrey Bienfait from the University of Paris-Saclay and her colleagues have “squeezed” the incoming microwave light. This form of quantum-state engineering provided as much as a 25% reduction in the noise as compared to the unsqueezed case.

Quantum squeezing is a way of increasing the sensitivity of a measurement by rigging Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle, which sets the lower noise limit for measurements of two complementary variables, such as position and momentum. In a squeezed state, the noise is lowered in the variable of interest, while the balance is made up with increased noise in the other variable. Researchers have used squeezed optical states to improve imaging and gravitational-wave measurements.

A. Bienfait, P. Campagne-Ibarcq, A. H. Kiilerich, X. Zhou, S. Probst, J. J. Pla, T. Schenkel, D. Vion, D. Esteve, J. J. L. Morton, K. Moelmer, and P. Bertet

In physics, resonance is a phenomenon in which a vibrating system or external force drives another system to oscillate with greater amplitude at specific frequencies.

Another common physics demonstration that serves as an excellent model of resonance is the famous "singing rod" demonstration. A long hollow aluminum rod is held at ...

The physics of resonance: Specially designed for high school students to explain one of the most impressive phenomena in all of physics

In physics, resonance is a phenomenon in which a vibrating system or external force drives another system to oscillate with greater amplitude at specific frequencies.

Another common physics demonstration that serves as an excellent model of resonance is the famous "singing rod" demonstration. A long hollow aluminum rod is held at ...

The physics of resonance: Specially designed for high school students to explain one of the most impressive phenomena in all of physics

Magnetic-resonance measurements of electron spins are starting to bump up against quantum limits, in which the noise level is dominated by quantum fluctuations in the microwave probe pulses. To go further in sensitivity, Audrey Bienfait from the University of Paris-Saclay and her colleagues have “squeezed” the incoming microwave light. This form of quantum-state engineering provided as much as a 25% reduction in the noise as compared to the unsqueezed case.

Quantum squeezing is a way of increasing the sensitivity of a measurement by rigging Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle, which sets the lower noise limit for measurements of two complementary variables, such as position and momentum. In a squeezed state, the noise is lowered in the variable of interest, while the balance is made up with increased noise in the other variable. Researchers have used squeezed optical states to improve imaging and gravitational-wave measurements.

A. Bienfait, P. Campagne-Ibarcq, A. H. Kiilerich, X. Zhou, S. Probst, J. J. Pla, T. Schenkel, D. Vion, D. Esteve, J. J. L. Morton, K. Moelmer, and P. Bertet

Suppose a father is pushing his daughter on a swing, so that she glides back and forth through the air. A swing, as noted earlier, is a classic example of an oscillator. When the child gets in the seat, the swing is in a position of stable equilibrium, but as the father pulls her back before releasing her, she is at maximum displacement.

Therefore, the father pushes her—but in order for his push to be effective, he must apply force at just the right moment. That right moment is the point of greatest amplitude—the point, that is, at which the father's pushing motion and the motion of the swing are in perfect resonance.

If the father waits until she is already on the downswing before he pushes her, not all the energy of his push will actually be applied to keeping her moving. He will have failed to efficiently add energy to his daughter's movement on the swing. On the other hand, if he pushes her too soon—that is, while she is on the upswing—he will actually take energy away from her movement.

This website uses cookies. By using our website and agreeing to our cookies policy, you consent to our use of cookies in accordance with the terms of this policy. Read more

Resonance is a journal of science education published by the Indian Academy of Sciences. It is directed to students and teachers at the undergraduate level, though some articles also appeal to the graduate level.

This journal features articles on physics, chemistry, biology, mathematics, computer science, and engineering. Articles fall into several categories: general articles, series, concise article-in-boxes, classroom pieces, nature-watch pieces, research news, book reviews, and information and announcements useful to students and teachers.

In physics, resonance is a phenomenon in which a vibrating system or external force drives another system to oscillate with greater amplitude at specific frequencies.

Another common physics demonstration that serves as an excellent model of resonance is the famous "singing rod" demonstration. A long hollow aluminum rod is held at ...

The physics of resonance: Specially designed for high school students to explain one of the most impressive phenomena in all of physics

Magnetic-resonance measurements of electron spins are starting to bump up against quantum limits, in which the noise level is dominated by quantum fluctuations in the microwave probe pulses. To go further in sensitivity, Audrey Bienfait from the University of Paris-Saclay and her colleagues have “squeezed” the incoming microwave light. This form of quantum-state engineering provided as much as a 25% reduction in the noise as compared to the unsqueezed case.

Quantum squeezing is a way of increasing the sensitivity of a measurement by rigging Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle, which sets the lower noise limit for measurements of two complementary variables, such as position and momentum. In a squeezed state, the noise is lowered in the variable of interest, while the balance is made up with increased noise in the other variable. Researchers have used squeezed optical states to improve imaging and gravitational-wave measurements.

A. Bienfait, P. Campagne-Ibarcq, A. H. Kiilerich, X. Zhou, S. Probst, J. J. Pla, T. Schenkel, D. Vion, D. Esteve, J. J. L. Morton, K. Moelmer, and P. Bertet

Suppose a father is pushing his daughter on a swing, so that she glides back and forth through the air. A swing, as noted earlier, is a classic example of an oscillator. When the child gets in the seat, the swing is in a position of stable equilibrium, but as the father pulls her back before releasing her, she is at maximum displacement.

Therefore, the father pushes her—but in order for his push to be effective, he must apply force at just the right moment. That right moment is the point of greatest amplitude—the point, that is, at which the father's pushing motion and the motion of the swing are in perfect resonance.

If the father waits until she is already on the downswing before he pushes her, not all the energy of his push will actually be applied to keeping her moving. He will have failed to efficiently add energy to his daughter's movement on the swing. On the other hand, if he pushes her too soon—that is, while she is on the upswing—he will actually take energy away from her movement.

In physics, resonance is a phenomenon in which a vibrating system or external force drives another system to oscillate with greater amplitude at specific frequencies.

Another common physics demonstration that serves as an excellent model of resonance is the famous "singing rod" demonstration. A long hollow aluminum rod is held at ...

The physics of resonance: Specially designed for high school students to explain one of the most impressive phenomena in all of physics

Magnetic-resonance measurements of electron spins are starting to bump up against quantum limits, in which the noise level is dominated by quantum fluctuations in the microwave probe pulses. To go further in sensitivity, Audrey Bienfait from the University of Paris-Saclay and her colleagues have “squeezed” the incoming microwave light. This form of quantum-state engineering provided as much as a 25% reduction in the noise as compared to the unsqueezed case.

Quantum squeezing is a way of increasing the sensitivity of a measurement by rigging Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle, which sets the lower noise limit for measurements of two complementary variables, such as position and momentum. In a squeezed state, the noise is lowered in the variable of interest, while the balance is made up with increased noise in the other variable. Researchers have used squeezed optical states to improve imaging and gravitational-wave measurements.

A. Bienfait, P. Campagne-Ibarcq, A. H. Kiilerich, X. Zhou, S. Probst, J. J. Pla, T. Schenkel, D. Vion, D. Esteve, J. J. L. Morton, K. Moelmer, and P. Bertet

Suppose a father is pushing his daughter on a swing, so that she glides back and forth through the air. A swing, as noted earlier, is a classic example of an oscillator. When the child gets in the seat, the swing is in a position of stable equilibrium, but as the father pulls her back before releasing her, she is at maximum displacement.

Therefore, the father pushes her—but in order for his push to be effective, he must apply force at just the right moment. That right moment is the point of greatest amplitude—the point, that is, at which the father's pushing motion and the motion of the swing are in perfect resonance.

If the father waits until she is already on the downswing before he pushes her, not all the energy of his push will actually be applied to keeping her moving. He will have failed to efficiently add energy to his daughter's movement on the swing. On the other hand, if he pushes her too soon—that is, while she is on the upswing—he will actually take energy away from her movement.

This website uses cookies. By using our website and agreeing to our cookies policy, you consent to our use of cookies in accordance with the terms of this policy. Read more

Resonance is a journal of science education published by the Indian Academy of Sciences. It is directed to students and teachers at the undergraduate level, though some articles also appeal to the graduate level.

This journal features articles on physics, chemistry, biology, mathematics, computer science, and engineering. Articles fall into several categories: general articles, series, concise article-in-boxes, classroom pieces, nature-watch pieces, research news, book reviews, and information and announcements useful to students and teachers.

Resonance is the cause of sound production in musical instruments. In the remainder of Lesson 5, the mathematics of standing waves will be applied to understanding how resonating strings and air columns produce their specific frequencies.



 


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