Since the Eagle rank is the highest a Scout can earn, every Scout should face roughly the same challenges. The district's role is to ensure that the Eagle Project and the Eagle Board of Review are reasonably consistent across all troops, so that an Eagle is an Eagle, regardless of his troop. Specifically, the district has two jobs:

Scouts can schedule their Eagle Board of Review to take place during the monthly Roundtable. Contact the district's Eagle Coordinator for more information.

An Eagle project is not an Eagle project unless it receives all necessary approvals before the work begins. This includes approval by the district Advancement Committee. In the Eagle River District, the review is performed by the Eagle Coordinator or a designee on the Advancement Committee.

Attaining the Eagle rank is often the end goal of a scout and his parents. It looks good on a resume and shows commitment to a program over an extended span of time. But, just like each rank advancement before it, the Eagle rank is a major advancement milestone, but not the culmination of scouting.

After reaching Eagle, a scout can continue to earn merit badges and be rewarded with an Eagle Palm for each 5 additional merit badges.

He can also continue to lead and guide the troop or he can change his focus to helping Cub Scouts become Boy Scouts. He may become a Junior Assistant Scoutmaster, helping the Scoutmaster with projects to improve the troop. Or, he can look for worthwhile endeavors outside of scouting to which he can apply his scouting background.
There are many ways an Eagle Scout can continue to contribute to and receive from the Scouting program.

Since the Eagle rank is the highest a Scout can earn, every Scout should face roughly the same challenges. The district's role is to ensure that the Eagle Project and the Eagle Board of Review are reasonably consistent across all troops, so that an Eagle is an Eagle, regardless of his troop. Specifically, the district has two jobs:

Scouts can schedule their Eagle Board of Review to take place during the monthly Roundtable. Contact the district's Eagle Coordinator for more information.

An Eagle project is not an Eagle project unless it receives all necessary approvals before the work begins. This includes approval by the district Advancement Committee. In the Eagle River District, the review is performed by the Eagle Coordinator or a designee on the Advancement Committee.

Attaining the Eagle rank is often the end goal of a scout and his parents. It looks good on a resume and shows commitment to a program over an extended span of time. But, just like each rank advancement before it, the Eagle rank is a major advancement milestone, but not the culmination of scouting.

After reaching Eagle, a scout can continue to earn merit badges and be rewarded with an Eagle Palm for each 5 additional merit badges.

He can also continue to lead and guide the troop or he can change his focus to helping Cub Scouts become Boy Scouts. He may become a Junior Assistant Scoutmaster, helping the Scoutmaster with projects to improve the troop. Or, he can look for worthwhile endeavors outside of scouting to which he can apply his scouting background.
There are many ways an Eagle Scout can continue to contribute to and receive from the Scouting program.

The fact that a boy is an Eagle Scout has always carried with it a special significance, not only in Scouting but also as he enters higher education, business or industry, and community service.

Not every boy who joins a Boy Scout troop earns the Eagle Scout rank. In fact, only 4 percent of all Boy Scouts do so. More than 1.2 million Boy Scouts have earned the rank since 1911, and they make up only 0.512% of the U.S. male population. Eagle Scouts are a special breed!

If you are part of a religious institution, school, or community organization and would like to propose a project to be completed by an Eagle Scout candidate, you can submit your proposal here . The project should be one that the Scout can plan, develop, and serve as a leader to others. Your suggestion will be listed here for no less than 60 days. If you wish to resubmit your proposal after the listing has expired, you may do so.

Since the Eagle rank is the highest a Scout can earn, every Scout should face roughly the same challenges. The district's role is to ensure that the Eagle Project and the Eagle Board of Review are reasonably consistent across all troops, so that an Eagle is an Eagle, regardless of his troop. Specifically, the district has two jobs:

Scouts can schedule their Eagle Board of Review to take place during the monthly Roundtable. Contact the district's Eagle Coordinator for more information.

An Eagle project is not an Eagle project unless it receives all necessary approvals before the work begins. This includes approval by the district Advancement Committee. In the Eagle River District, the review is performed by the Eagle Coordinator or a designee on the Advancement Committee.


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