A bit eccentric, but dear friend of mine is obsessed with good luck symbols. He's got troves of various good luck charms, trinkets and objects. Tabletops are dotted with lucky doo-dads, curio cabinets stuffed with auspicious knick-knacks from around the world...you name it, he's got some kind of object to convey luck and fortune.

You could say he's devoted a large portion of his life to amassing this treasure of good luck symbols. We talk a lot, and much of the data I write about pertaining to good luck emblems comes from our discussions.

Sometimes our discussions get into rabid debates. Bucky (that's his name, a nick name actually because he's always "bucking" bad luck - so everybody calls him Bucky or Lucky Bucky) thinks his luck comes from the object. The stones he carries around in his pockets, the lucky charms he has crammed in his car, his office and home....to him, these objects are the source of his good luck.

As a whole, mankind is a superstitious lot. The world is a cruel place and we need all the help we can get. So, what do we do? We turn to our amulets and charms, our talismans, and sometimes, even our animals with the hope that a little good luck will protect us from whatever’s out there. However, some of those charms have a pretty unsettling story.

On one side of the medal is the cross of Saint Benedict and an incantation recited to drive away the devil. The letters around the outside of the medal (V.R.S.N.S.M.V.) stand for “ Vade retro Satana; nunquam suade mihi vana .” In English, that translates to “Begone Satan! Suggest not to be they vain things.”

Saint Benedict’s teachings have been around for centuries, recorded most completely in the sixth-century writings of Saint Gregory the Great. But the incantation that adorns his medal came much later, and was discovered during a trial for witchcraft. In 1647, a group of women were on trial for witchcraft in the Bavarian city of Natternberg . The women testified that while they did wield the power of witchcraft and the devil, there was one place where they had no power . . . the nearby abbey at Metten. The women claimed the abbey was under some sort of particularly powerful protection, and they were unable to overcome whatever it was.

A bit eccentric, but dear friend of mine is obsessed with good luck symbols. He's got troves of various good luck charms, trinkets and objects. Tabletops are dotted with lucky doo-dads, curio cabinets stuffed with auspicious knick-knacks from around the world...you name it, he's got some kind of object to convey luck and fortune.

You could say he's devoted a large portion of his life to amassing this treasure of good luck symbols. We talk a lot, and much of the data I write about pertaining to good luck emblems comes from our discussions.

Sometimes our discussions get into rabid debates. Bucky (that's his name, a nick name actually because he's always "bucking" bad luck - so everybody calls him Bucky or Lucky Bucky) thinks his luck comes from the object. The stones he carries around in his pockets, the lucky charms he has crammed in his car, his office and home....to him, these objects are the source of his good luck.

As a whole, mankind is a superstitious lot. The world is a cruel place and we need all the help we can get. So, what do we do? We turn to our amulets and charms, our talismans, and sometimes, even our animals with the hope that a little good luck will protect us from whatever’s out there. However, some of those charms have a pretty unsettling story.

On one side of the medal is the cross of Saint Benedict and an incantation recited to drive away the devil. The letters around the outside of the medal (V.R.S.N.S.M.V.) stand for “ Vade retro Satana; nunquam suade mihi vana .” In English, that translates to “Begone Satan! Suggest not to be they vain things.”

Saint Benedict’s teachings have been around for centuries, recorded most completely in the sixth-century writings of Saint Gregory the Great. But the incantation that adorns his medal came much later, and was discovered during a trial for witchcraft. In 1647, a group of women were on trial for witchcraft in the Bavarian city of Natternberg . The women testified that while they did wield the power of witchcraft and the devil, there was one place where they had no power . . . the nearby abbey at Metten. The women claimed the abbey was under some sort of particularly powerful protection, and they were unable to overcome whatever it was.

Why does one person get sick while another stays healthy? Why does one person seem to find wealth and prosperity everywhere, while another never succeeds at anything? Many believe that the answer is luck. 

For some people, good luck comes naturally. But if you feel like the old saying, "If it weren't for bad luck, I'd have no luck at all" applies to you, there's good news: it IS possible to turn your luck around. A lucky attitude goes a long way toward making you not only feel luckier, but actually be luckier.

Even the luckiest people aren't lucky all the time. You will never be able to correctly call every toss of the coin or win every giveaway you enter. However, you can tilt the odds to be more in your favor.

A bit eccentric, but dear friend of mine is obsessed with good luck symbols. He's got troves of various good luck charms, trinkets and objects. Tabletops are dotted with lucky doo-dads, curio cabinets stuffed with auspicious knick-knacks from around the world...you name it, he's got some kind of object to convey luck and fortune.

You could say he's devoted a large portion of his life to amassing this treasure of good luck symbols. We talk a lot, and much of the data I write about pertaining to good luck emblems comes from our discussions.

Sometimes our discussions get into rabid debates. Bucky (that's his name, a nick name actually because he's always "bucking" bad luck - so everybody calls him Bucky or Lucky Bucky) thinks his luck comes from the object. The stones he carries around in his pockets, the lucky charms he has crammed in his car, his office and home....to him, these objects are the source of his good luck.

As a whole, mankind is a superstitious lot. The world is a cruel place and we need all the help we can get. So, what do we do? We turn to our amulets and charms, our talismans, and sometimes, even our animals with the hope that a little good luck will protect us from whatever’s out there. However, some of those charms have a pretty unsettling story.

On one side of the medal is the cross of Saint Benedict and an incantation recited to drive away the devil. The letters around the outside of the medal (V.R.S.N.S.M.V.) stand for “ Vade retro Satana; nunquam suade mihi vana .” In English, that translates to “Begone Satan! Suggest not to be they vain things.”

Saint Benedict’s teachings have been around for centuries, recorded most completely in the sixth-century writings of Saint Gregory the Great. But the incantation that adorns his medal came much later, and was discovered during a trial for witchcraft. In 1647, a group of women were on trial for witchcraft in the Bavarian city of Natternberg . The women testified that while they did wield the power of witchcraft and the devil, there was one place where they had no power . . . the nearby abbey at Metten. The women claimed the abbey was under some sort of particularly powerful protection, and they were unable to overcome whatever it was.

Why does one person get sick while another stays healthy? Why does one person seem to find wealth and prosperity everywhere, while another never succeeds at anything? Many believe that the answer is luck. 

For some people, good luck comes naturally. But if you feel like the old saying, "If it weren't for bad luck, I'd have no luck at all" applies to you, there's good news: it IS possible to turn your luck around. A lucky attitude goes a long way toward making you not only feel luckier, but actually be luckier.

Even the luckiest people aren't lucky all the time. You will never be able to correctly call every toss of the coin or win every giveaway you enter. However, you can tilt the odds to be more in your favor.

For thousands of years, people have utilized good luck talismans, charms, and amulets to bring fortune their way. Whether it’s something you’ve crafted yourself, found outdoors in nature, or even purchased, good luck talismans can come in handy. Let’s look at some of the different items people around the world have carried around or displayed in their homes, and how good luck charms and talismans can help you in your daily life.

In many different folk magic traditions, the horseshoe is considered a symbol of good luck. You can hang one over the door to your home to bring fortune, as well as protection, your way. In many areas, the horseshoe is displayed with the open side at the top, to contain good fortune and keep it from spilling out.

There’s a great story about the origins of the horseshoe as a good luck talisman. It’s said that Saint Dunstan, who was once the Archbishop of Canterbury, “nailed a horseshoe to the Devil's hoof when he was asked to re-shoe the Devil's horse. This caused the Devil great pain, and Dunstan only agreed to remove the shoe and release the Devil after he promised never to enter a place where a horseshoe is over the door.”

A bit eccentric, but dear friend of mine is obsessed with good luck symbols. He's got troves of various good luck charms, trinkets and objects. Tabletops are dotted with lucky doo-dads, curio cabinets stuffed with auspicious knick-knacks from around the world...you name it, he's got some kind of object to convey luck and fortune.

You could say he's devoted a large portion of his life to amassing this treasure of good luck symbols. We talk a lot, and much of the data I write about pertaining to good luck emblems comes from our discussions.

Sometimes our discussions get into rabid debates. Bucky (that's his name, a nick name actually because he's always "bucking" bad luck - so everybody calls him Bucky or Lucky Bucky) thinks his luck comes from the object. The stones he carries around in his pockets, the lucky charms he has crammed in his car, his office and home....to him, these objects are the source of his good luck.


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