Please note that Internet Explorer version 8.x is not supported as of January 1, 2016. Please refer to this blog post for more information.

Different families of Yang-Mills instantons exist in space-time of different topology. Two (self-dual) examples are provided in Schwarzschild space having SU(2) Pontryagin numbers ±1 and ±2 n 2 ( n = integer). The latter solution describes a dyon. The Reissner-Nordstrom geometry also admits of non-self-dual solutions.

Some of Mill's most significant innovations to the utilitarian tradition concern his claims about the nature of happiness and the role of happiness in human motivation. Bentham and James Mill understand happiness hedonistically, as consisting in pleasure, and they believe that the ultimate aim of each person is predominantly, if not exclusively, the promotion of the agent's own happiness (pleasure).

Bentham begins his Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation (1789) with this hedonistic assumption about human motivation.

Bentham allows that we may be moved by the pleasures and pains of others. But he appears to think that these other-regarding pleasures can move us only insofar as we take pleasure in the pleasure of others (V 32). This suggests that Bentham endorses a version of psychological egoism, which claims that the agent's own happiness is and can be the only ultimate object of his desires. In his unfinished Constitutional Code (1832), Bentham makes this commitment to psychological egoism clear.

Please note that Internet Explorer version 8.x is not supported as of January 1, 2016. Please refer to this blog post for more information.

Different families of Yang-Mills instantons exist in space-time of different topology. Two (self-dual) examples are provided in Schwarzschild space having SU(2) Pontryagin numbers ±1 and ±2 n 2 ( n = integer). The latter solution describes a dyon. The Reissner-Nordstrom geometry also admits of non-self-dual solutions.

Some of Mill's most significant innovations to the utilitarian tradition concern his claims about the nature of happiness and the role of happiness in human motivation. Bentham and James Mill understand happiness hedonistically, as consisting in pleasure, and they believe that the ultimate aim of each person is predominantly, if not exclusively, the promotion of the agent's own happiness (pleasure).

Bentham begins his Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation (1789) with this hedonistic assumption about human motivation.

Bentham allows that we may be moved by the pleasures and pains of others. But he appears to think that these other-regarding pleasures can move us only insofar as we take pleasure in the pleasure of others (V 32). This suggests that Bentham endorses a version of psychological egoism, which claims that the agent's own happiness is and can be the only ultimate object of his desires. In his unfinished Constitutional Code (1832), Bentham makes this commitment to psychological egoism clear.

As noted in my previous post about the King-Sharp family history, my grandmother Della Ann Mills was the daughter of James Preston Mills and Mary Orlena (sometimes spelled Orleana, Orlene or Lena) Hodges.[1] This fact is confirmed by the 1900 and 1910 Census records.[2],[3] This is also confirmed by my great-grandmother’s death certificate. [4]

When I last visited my grandparents, they showed me a photograph of the Mills family, which appears to be from around 1910 or 1915 based on the apparent ages of the subjects. My great-grandmother would probably be one of the two young women on the left (her older sister Cleo being the other); my great-great-grandmother Mary Orlena Hodges would be the middle-aged woman in the center.

In turn, we can see from 19th-century Census records that Mary Orlena Hodges (my great-great grandmother) was the daughter of John Christopher Columbus Hodges.[5] For example, the 1880 Census shows us:

Please note that Internet Explorer version 8.x is not supported as of January 1, 2016. Please refer to this blog post for more information.

Different families of Yang-Mills instantons exist in space-time of different topology. Two (self-dual) examples are provided in Schwarzschild space having SU(2) Pontryagin numbers ±1 and ±2 n 2 ( n = integer). The latter solution describes a dyon. The Reissner-Nordstrom geometry also admits of non-self-dual solutions.


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