We urge you to turn off your ad blocker for The Telegraph website so that you can continue to access our quality content in the future.

Big Fat Hen by Keith Baker is a simple counting book with minimal text. What is lacks in words it delivers in illustrations. The rich colors of the hens, the golden hay and the yellow chicks were all expertly executed. We read the board book version of this and I would suggest that this is a book for that age, who will love pictures more and more with every turn of the page. The text that is included is rhyming and pleasant but the illustrations steal the show.

How Big Is a Pig? by Claire Beaton is a favorite in our house and has been for both my kids. I love the felt illustrations, the detail amazes me and helps distract me from noticing that I have read it 20 times in as many minutes. The story itself is great too, it focuses on opposites in the farm yard with a zippy rhyming text. My daughter loves taking this one in the stroller while I run and because it’s a board book I can give it to her without worrying that after a few miles it’s ripped and ruined.

Lulu the Big Little Chick by Paulette Bogan is an old familiar tale about a little chick who is frustrated about being too little to do anything so instead she decides to go far far away. When I started reading this to my presently obsessed with superheros son he didn’t want to read it unless the chick had super powers. I convinced him to read it with me to find out and it took all of one page before he was hooked.  He was so worried about how far the little chick would go and why would she want to go in the first place?! The cartoon like illustrations were a perfect compliment and fresh addition to a familiar tale.

I like to encourage my children to be creative and have FUN after reading their own independent books or ones that I assign for their school work.

This reminds me of when the school where my older children went started their reading incentive program. The first year they did it we were able to do little projects like this for the books that were read. Unfortunately they moved away from that format.
I love all these ideas and hope to have the girls do things like this as they get older. Thanks

Kids love this 1936 story about a bull who doesn't want to fight, but it was actually seen as propaganda and banned by Hitler. Amazon In case you needed an excuse to reread all your favorite kids' books again, it just so happens that there are a lot of important life lessons, conspiracy theories, and hidden messages in the books we loved as children — we just probably didn't pick up on them back then.

With help from  The New York Public Library's Youth Materials Specialist, Betsy Bird , we put together a list of 23 books worth giving a second read.

But today's literary gems aren't designed for you and I, they're apparently destined to be enjoyed by children and young impressionable minds the world over. Now in fairness, several of these books have either been pulled or ceased circulation - but quite how they were even signed off and approved in the first place is an utter mystery...

There's a lot to giggle at, even more to be dumbfounded by and some truly WTF moments ahead in our list of 21 inappropriate books for kids.

We urge you to turn off your ad blocker for The Telegraph website so that you can continue to access our quality content in the future.

Big Fat Hen by Keith Baker is a simple counting book with minimal text. What is lacks in words it delivers in illustrations. The rich colors of the hens, the golden hay and the yellow chicks were all expertly executed. We read the board book version of this and I would suggest that this is a book for that age, who will love pictures more and more with every turn of the page. The text that is included is rhyming and pleasant but the illustrations steal the show.

How Big Is a Pig? by Claire Beaton is a favorite in our house and has been for both my kids. I love the felt illustrations, the detail amazes me and helps distract me from noticing that I have read it 20 times in as many minutes. The story itself is great too, it focuses on opposites in the farm yard with a zippy rhyming text. My daughter loves taking this one in the stroller while I run and because it’s a board book I can give it to her without worrying that after a few miles it’s ripped and ruined.

Lulu the Big Little Chick by Paulette Bogan is an old familiar tale about a little chick who is frustrated about being too little to do anything so instead she decides to go far far away. When I started reading this to my presently obsessed with superheros son he didn’t want to read it unless the chick had super powers. I convinced him to read it with me to find out and it took all of one page before he was hooked.  He was so worried about how far the little chick would go and why would she want to go in the first place?! The cartoon like illustrations were a perfect compliment and fresh addition to a familiar tale.

I like to encourage my children to be creative and have FUN after reading their own independent books or ones that I assign for their school work.

This reminds me of when the school where my older children went started their reading incentive program. The first year they did it we were able to do little projects like this for the books that were read. Unfortunately they moved away from that format.
I love all these ideas and hope to have the girls do things like this as they get older. Thanks

Kids love this 1936 story about a bull who doesn't want to fight, but it was actually seen as propaganda and banned by Hitler. Amazon In case you needed an excuse to reread all your favorite kids' books again, it just so happens that there are a lot of important life lessons, conspiracy theories, and hidden messages in the books we loved as children — we just probably didn't pick up on them back then.

With help from  The New York Public Library's Youth Materials Specialist, Betsy Bird , we put together a list of 23 books worth giving a second read.

We urge you to turn off your ad blocker for The Telegraph website so that you can continue to access our quality content in the future.

Big Fat Hen by Keith Baker is a simple counting book with minimal text. What is lacks in words it delivers in illustrations. The rich colors of the hens, the golden hay and the yellow chicks were all expertly executed. We read the board book version of this and I would suggest that this is a book for that age, who will love pictures more and more with every turn of the page. The text that is included is rhyming and pleasant but the illustrations steal the show.

How Big Is a Pig? by Claire Beaton is a favorite in our house and has been for both my kids. I love the felt illustrations, the detail amazes me and helps distract me from noticing that I have read it 20 times in as many minutes. The story itself is great too, it focuses on opposites in the farm yard with a zippy rhyming text. My daughter loves taking this one in the stroller while I run and because it’s a board book I can give it to her without worrying that after a few miles it’s ripped and ruined.

Lulu the Big Little Chick by Paulette Bogan is an old familiar tale about a little chick who is frustrated about being too little to do anything so instead she decides to go far far away. When I started reading this to my presently obsessed with superheros son he didn’t want to read it unless the chick had super powers. I convinced him to read it with me to find out and it took all of one page before he was hooked.  He was so worried about how far the little chick would go and why would she want to go in the first place?! The cartoon like illustrations were a perfect compliment and fresh addition to a familiar tale.

I like to encourage my children to be creative and have FUN after reading their own independent books or ones that I assign for their school work.

This reminds me of when the school where my older children went started their reading incentive program. The first year they did it we were able to do little projects like this for the books that were read. Unfortunately they moved away from that format.
I love all these ideas and hope to have the girls do things like this as they get older. Thanks

We urge you to turn off your ad blocker for The Telegraph website so that you can continue to access our quality content in the future.

Big Fat Hen by Keith Baker is a simple counting book with minimal text. What is lacks in words it delivers in illustrations. The rich colors of the hens, the golden hay and the yellow chicks were all expertly executed. We read the board book version of this and I would suggest that this is a book for that age, who will love pictures more and more with every turn of the page. The text that is included is rhyming and pleasant but the illustrations steal the show.

How Big Is a Pig? by Claire Beaton is a favorite in our house and has been for both my kids. I love the felt illustrations, the detail amazes me and helps distract me from noticing that I have read it 20 times in as many minutes. The story itself is great too, it focuses on opposites in the farm yard with a zippy rhyming text. My daughter loves taking this one in the stroller while I run and because it’s a board book I can give it to her without worrying that after a few miles it’s ripped and ruined.

Lulu the Big Little Chick by Paulette Bogan is an old familiar tale about a little chick who is frustrated about being too little to do anything so instead she decides to go far far away. When I started reading this to my presently obsessed with superheros son he didn’t want to read it unless the chick had super powers. I convinced him to read it with me to find out and it took all of one page before he was hooked.  He was so worried about how far the little chick would go and why would she want to go in the first place?! The cartoon like illustrations were a perfect compliment and fresh addition to a familiar tale.

We urge you to turn off your ad blocker for The Telegraph website so that you can continue to access our quality content in the future.


bookmarkyourlink.info
51kMCGP931L