Die Laughing reaffirms that there are none more lethal or lovable than Harley Quinn. When she calls on the banana phone, you answer.

As it so happens, Harley Quinn   is a rare breed when it comes to Rebirth titles because not only did it retain the same creative team from the New 52, but also due to the fact that it pretty much picked up where the previous volume left off. Granted, new writers and artists should always be welcomed lest a series grow stale, but I’m far from ready to say goodbye to writers Amanda Conner and Jimmy Palmiotti. In my opinion, they’ve made the most significant contributions to the character since Bruce Timm and Paul Dini.

Perhaps just as important are artists Chad Hardin and John Timms, both of whom have also been on board since the New 52. In that timespan, there have indeed been guest artists here and there, but it’s their pencils and inks that have established a visual precedent that has even carried over to related miniseries they didn’t even work on. The only other example I can think of comparable to that in recent memory has to be that of J.H. Williams III’s take on Batwoman.

Die Laughing reaffirms that there are none more lethal or lovable than Harley Quinn. When she calls on the banana phone, you answer.

As it so happens, Harley Quinn   is a rare breed when it comes to Rebirth titles because not only did it retain the same creative team from the New 52, but also due to the fact that it pretty much picked up where the previous volume left off. Granted, new writers and artists should always be welcomed lest a series grow stale, but I’m far from ready to say goodbye to writers Amanda Conner and Jimmy Palmiotti. In my opinion, they’ve made the most significant contributions to the character since Bruce Timm and Paul Dini.

Perhaps just as important are artists Chad Hardin and John Timms, both of whom have also been on board since the New 52. In that timespan, there have indeed been guest artists here and there, but it’s their pencils and inks that have established a visual precedent that has even carried over to related miniseries they didn’t even work on. The only other example I can think of comparable to that in recent memory has to be that of J.H. Williams III’s take on Batwoman.

Welcome back to Harley Quinn’s crazy world on Coney Island…now get ready to wave goodbye, because everyone there just might get eaten alive! Harley’s gotta protect her neighborhood against an all-out zombie apocalypse! Break out the chainsaws, everybody! Then, Harley must set out on a journey that will take her around the world—and into the clutches of a bizarre robotic enemy! And Harley carves her way through the rock underground of New York City, looking for the criminals who hurt someone she cared about…unfortunately, one of the crooks in question has fallen in love with her. Collects issues #1-7. 

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Die Laughing reaffirms that there are none more lethal or lovable than Harley Quinn. When she calls on the banana phone, you answer.

As it so happens, Harley Quinn   is a rare breed when it comes to Rebirth titles because not only did it retain the same creative team from the New 52, but also due to the fact that it pretty much picked up where the previous volume left off. Granted, new writers and artists should always be welcomed lest a series grow stale, but I’m far from ready to say goodbye to writers Amanda Conner and Jimmy Palmiotti. In my opinion, they’ve made the most significant contributions to the character since Bruce Timm and Paul Dini.

Perhaps just as important are artists Chad Hardin and John Timms, both of whom have also been on board since the New 52. In that timespan, there have indeed been guest artists here and there, but it’s their pencils and inks that have established a visual precedent that has even carried over to related miniseries they didn’t even work on. The only other example I can think of comparable to that in recent memory has to be that of J.H. Williams III’s take on Batwoman.

Welcome back to Harley Quinn’s crazy world on Coney Island…now get ready to wave goodbye, because everyone there just might get eaten alive! Harley’s gotta protect her neighborhood against an all-out zombie apocalypse! Break out the chainsaws, everybody! Then, Harley must set out on a journey that will take her around the world—and into the clutches of a bizarre robotic enemy! And Harley carves her way through the rock underground of New York City, looking for the criminals who hurt someone she cared about…unfortunately, one of the crooks in question has fallen in love with her. Collects issues #1-7. 


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