The Middle Ages saw the beginnings of a rebirth in literature. Early medieval books were painstakingly hand-copied and illustrated by monks. Paper was a rarity, with vellum, made from calf's skin, and parchment, made from lamb's skin, were the media of choice for writing. Students learning to write used wooden tablets covered in green or black wax. The greatest number of books during this era were bound with plain wooden boards, or with simple tooled leather for more expensive volumes.

Fulfillment by Amazon (FBA) is a service we offer sellers that lets them store their products in Amazon's fulfillment centers, and we directly pack, ship, and provide customer service for these products. Something we hope you'll especially enjoy: FBA items qualify for FREE Shipping and Amazon Prime.

If you're a seller, Fulfillment by Amazon can help you increase your sales. We invite you to learn more about Fulfillment by Amazon .

Andrew Galloway is Professor of English and Medieval Studies at Cornell University. He is the author of The Penn Commentary on Piers Plowman, Vol. I (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2006), and numerous essays and chapters on medieval literature.

Welcome to the wild and crazy world of medieval literature! We've got dragons, we've got King Arthur, we've got knights, we've got some more dragons. It's pretty awesome. I don't know about you, but I played with the Lego castle constantly when I was a kid. I designed booby traps that were dumping stuff on people coming through the portcullis; I was obsessed. And you should be too. Think about all that stuff and get yourself really excited. That should help you through the sometimes frustrating, but also rewarding, study of medieval literature.

Now it's time to figure out Who was writing? and What were they writing? Per capita, there actually weren't a lot of people writing because not a lot of people were literate. People associated with the church could read, and people who were highborn could probably read. A lot of the oral traditions couldn't survive unless someone who was literate wrote them down. That was the case for the first piece of medieval lit we're going to talk about, which is called Caedmon's Hymn .

Caedmon's Hymn is the earliest recorded poem in Old English. Old English has the word 'English' in it, but you won't be able to read it if you try. It's super old (obviously) and pretty far removed from modern English - it's basically a foreign language to us. Caedmon himself was illiterate, so this was composed orally. It was written down by a guy named the Venerable Bede around the seventh century A.D. He wrote it in Latin, and that's the reason we have it, because this literate guy wrote it down.

Medieval literature was rooted in Christian themes such as good and evil, death and resurrection, and heaven and Earth. For example, William Langland’s “Piers Plowman” served as a religious allegory in which the main character, “Will,” set out to find eternal salvation, guided by the Holy Church, Conscience and Scripture. In contrast, Renaissance literature focused on “here and now,” on humanistic themes of inner character, moral complexity and change. John Milton’s epic poem “Paradise Lost,” for instance, presented Satan as a sympathetic character, a tragically flawed hero who longs for power, not unlike Shakespeare’s “Macbeth.”

Philosophically, medieval literature interpreted the world in absolute theological terms. The end of “Piers Plowman” portrayed a fallen world that spiritual pilgrims had to traverse to reach salvation. Renaissance literature, on the other hand, embraced man’s capacity for change and political reform, precipitating a shift from religious concerns to secular concerns. One of the best examples of this shift is Thomas More’s “Utopia,” a fictional narrative that criticized contemporary society while envisioning a new way of living based on communal property and religious tolerance.

Scott Neuffer is an award-winning journalist and writer who lives in Nevada. He holds a bachelor's degree in English and spent five years as an education and business reporter for Sierra Nevada Media Group. His first collection of short stories, "Scars of the New Order," was published in 2014.

The texts included here from "The Middle Ages" attempt to convey that diversity. They date from the sixth to the late- fifteenth century. Eight were originally in Old French, six in Latin, five in English, two in Old Saxon, two in Old Icelandic, and one each in Catalan, Hebrew, Greek, and Arabic.

The Middle Ages saw the beginnings of a rebirth in literature. Early medieval books were painstakingly hand-copied and illustrated by monks. Paper was a rarity, with vellum, made from calf's skin, and parchment, made from lamb's skin, were the media of choice for writing. Students learning to write used wooden tablets covered in green or black wax. The greatest number of books during this era were bound with plain wooden boards, or with simple tooled leather for more expensive volumes.

The Middle Ages saw the beginnings of a rebirth in literature. Early medieval books were painstakingly hand-copied and illustrated by monks. Paper was a rarity, with vellum, made from calf's skin, and parchment, made from lamb's skin, were the media of choice for writing. Students learning to write used wooden tablets covered in green or black wax. The greatest number of books during this era were bound with plain wooden boards, or with simple tooled leather for more expensive volumes.

Fulfillment by Amazon (FBA) is a service we offer sellers that lets them store their products in Amazon's fulfillment centers, and we directly pack, ship, and provide customer service for these products. Something we hope you'll especially enjoy: FBA items qualify for FREE Shipping and Amazon Prime.

If you're a seller, Fulfillment by Amazon can help you increase your sales. We invite you to learn more about Fulfillment by Amazon .

Andrew Galloway is Professor of English and Medieval Studies at Cornell University. He is the author of The Penn Commentary on Piers Plowman, Vol. I (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2006), and numerous essays and chapters on medieval literature.

Welcome to the wild and crazy world of medieval literature! We've got dragons, we've got King Arthur, we've got knights, we've got some more dragons. It's pretty awesome. I don't know about you, but I played with the Lego castle constantly when I was a kid. I designed booby traps that were dumping stuff on people coming through the portcullis; I was obsessed. And you should be too. Think about all that stuff and get yourself really excited. That should help you through the sometimes frustrating, but also rewarding, study of medieval literature.

Now it's time to figure out Who was writing? and What were they writing? Per capita, there actually weren't a lot of people writing because not a lot of people were literate. People associated with the church could read, and people who were highborn could probably read. A lot of the oral traditions couldn't survive unless someone who was literate wrote them down. That was the case for the first piece of medieval lit we're going to talk about, which is called Caedmon's Hymn .

Caedmon's Hymn is the earliest recorded poem in Old English. Old English has the word 'English' in it, but you won't be able to read it if you try. It's super old (obviously) and pretty far removed from modern English - it's basically a foreign language to us. Caedmon himself was illiterate, so this was composed orally. It was written down by a guy named the Venerable Bede around the seventh century A.D. He wrote it in Latin, and that's the reason we have it, because this literate guy wrote it down.

The Middle Ages saw the beginnings of a rebirth in literature. Early medieval books were painstakingly hand-copied and illustrated by monks. Paper was a rarity, with vellum, made from calf's skin, and parchment, made from lamb's skin, were the media of choice for writing. Students learning to write used wooden tablets covered in green or black wax. The greatest number of books during this era were bound with plain wooden boards, or with simple tooled leather for more expensive volumes.

Fulfillment by Amazon (FBA) is a service we offer sellers that lets them store their products in Amazon's fulfillment centers, and we directly pack, ship, and provide customer service for these products. Something we hope you'll especially enjoy: FBA items qualify for FREE Shipping and Amazon Prime.

If you're a seller, Fulfillment by Amazon can help you increase your sales. We invite you to learn more about Fulfillment by Amazon .

Andrew Galloway is Professor of English and Medieval Studies at Cornell University. He is the author of The Penn Commentary on Piers Plowman, Vol. I (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2006), and numerous essays and chapters on medieval literature.

The Middle Ages saw the beginnings of a rebirth in literature. Early medieval books were painstakingly hand-copied and illustrated by monks. Paper was a rarity, with vellum, made from calf's skin, and parchment, made from lamb's skin, were the media of choice for writing. Students learning to write used wooden tablets covered in green or black wax. The greatest number of books during this era were bound with plain wooden boards, or with simple tooled leather for more expensive volumes.

Fulfillment by Amazon (FBA) is a service we offer sellers that lets them store their products in Amazon's fulfillment centers, and we directly pack, ship, and provide customer service for these products. Something we hope you'll especially enjoy: FBA items qualify for FREE Shipping and Amazon Prime.

If you're a seller, Fulfillment by Amazon can help you increase your sales. We invite you to learn more about Fulfillment by Amazon .

Andrew Galloway is Professor of English and Medieval Studies at Cornell University. He is the author of The Penn Commentary on Piers Plowman, Vol. I (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2006), and numerous essays and chapters on medieval literature.

Welcome to the wild and crazy world of medieval literature! We've got dragons, we've got King Arthur, we've got knights, we've got some more dragons. It's pretty awesome. I don't know about you, but I played with the Lego castle constantly when I was a kid. I designed booby traps that were dumping stuff on people coming through the portcullis; I was obsessed. And you should be too. Think about all that stuff and get yourself really excited. That should help you through the sometimes frustrating, but also rewarding, study of medieval literature.

Now it's time to figure out Who was writing? and What were they writing? Per capita, there actually weren't a lot of people writing because not a lot of people were literate. People associated with the church could read, and people who were highborn could probably read. A lot of the oral traditions couldn't survive unless someone who was literate wrote them down. That was the case for the first piece of medieval lit we're going to talk about, which is called Caedmon's Hymn .

Caedmon's Hymn is the earliest recorded poem in Old English. Old English has the word 'English' in it, but you won't be able to read it if you try. It's super old (obviously) and pretty far removed from modern English - it's basically a foreign language to us. Caedmon himself was illiterate, so this was composed orally. It was written down by a guy named the Venerable Bede around the seventh century A.D. He wrote it in Latin, and that's the reason we have it, because this literate guy wrote it down.

Medieval literature was rooted in Christian themes such as good and evil, death and resurrection, and heaven and Earth. For example, William Langland’s “Piers Plowman” served as a religious allegory in which the main character, “Will,” set out to find eternal salvation, guided by the Holy Church, Conscience and Scripture. In contrast, Renaissance literature focused on “here and now,” on humanistic themes of inner character, moral complexity and change. John Milton’s epic poem “Paradise Lost,” for instance, presented Satan as a sympathetic character, a tragically flawed hero who longs for power, not unlike Shakespeare’s “Macbeth.”

Philosophically, medieval literature interpreted the world in absolute theological terms. The end of “Piers Plowman” portrayed a fallen world that spiritual pilgrims had to traverse to reach salvation. Renaissance literature, on the other hand, embraced man’s capacity for change and political reform, precipitating a shift from religious concerns to secular concerns. One of the best examples of this shift is Thomas More’s “Utopia,” a fictional narrative that criticized contemporary society while envisioning a new way of living based on communal property and religious tolerance.

Scott Neuffer is an award-winning journalist and writer who lives in Nevada. He holds a bachelor's degree in English and spent five years as an education and business reporter for Sierra Nevada Media Group. His first collection of short stories, "Scars of the New Order," was published in 2014.


bookmarkyourlink.info
41K6-PHH22L