In the last decade, eco products have become all the rage as people make an effort to be kinder to the environment, as well as their wallets.

Some folk however, aren’t happy to stop at solar panels on their roofs, or a hybrid car. Instead they’ve pulled out all the punches in the name of eco living and built some truly innovative houses, which are entirely, or mainly, made out of natural and eco-friendly materials.

The possibilities in what you can use to make a house are endless. Wood and stone are obvious examples, but recycled glass bottles and car tires are also great for insulation.

A lkanet (Alkanna tinctoria) root
Purples to blue gray in an alkaline dyebath. The color is enhanced by adding alcohol extract to premordanted wool or silk in dyebath.

Cochineal (dried bugs ) No mordant gives pinks/magenta. With tin mordant yields reds/oranges. An ammonia afterbath will result in purples.

Myrobalan (Terminalia chebula ) Yellow to black colour. However its importance is that it contains 90% natural tannin. Use as substitute for tannin. Also can use instead of TARA (contains only 50% tannin)

Sponsored Products are advertisements for products sold by merchants on Amazon.com. When you click on a Sponsored Product ad, you will be taken to an Amazon detail page where you can learn more about the product and purchase it.

Dec 06 A practical guide, learn to create an exquisite palette of colours to dye wool, silk, cotton and other materials using flowers, onion skins, bark, roots, walnut shells, and other natural materials. * Knit 'N Style *

Jenny Dean is a linguist, lecturer, and experimental dyer who has a business supplying natural dyes and runs workshops on natural dyeing.

DROP SPINDLES
How To Make A Drop Spindle
Types of Drop Spindles
Spinning Yarn With a Drop Spindle

SPINNING WHEELS
Selecting the Right Spinning Wheel
Styles of Spinning Wheels
Parts Of The Spinning Wheel
How The Spinning Wheel Works
Adjusting The Spinning Wheel's Tension
Drive Ratios & Twists Per Inch
* Spinning Wheel Maintenance

HANDSPINNING TECHNIQUES
* Basic Yarn Design
Handspinning Woollen and Worsted Yarn
Preparing to Handspin Yarn on the Spinning Wheel
* Basic Handspinning Techniques
Adding On More Fiber
Plying Yarn with a Spinning Wheel
Navajo Plying
Making A Skein of Yarn With A Niddy Noddy
Setting in the Twist of Handspun Yarn
What Do I Do If? ...

In the last decade, eco products have become all the rage as people make an effort to be kinder to the environment, as well as their wallets.

Some folk however, aren’t happy to stop at solar panels on their roofs, or a hybrid car. Instead they’ve pulled out all the punches in the name of eco living and built some truly innovative houses, which are entirely, or mainly, made out of natural and eco-friendly materials.

The possibilities in what you can use to make a house are endless. Wood and stone are obvious examples, but recycled glass bottles and car tires are also great for insulation.

A lkanet (Alkanna tinctoria) root
Purples to blue gray in an alkaline dyebath. The color is enhanced by adding alcohol extract to premordanted wool or silk in dyebath.

Cochineal (dried bugs ) No mordant gives pinks/magenta. With tin mordant yields reds/oranges. An ammonia afterbath will result in purples.

Myrobalan (Terminalia chebula ) Yellow to black colour. However its importance is that it contains 90% natural tannin. Use as substitute for tannin. Also can use instead of TARA (contains only 50% tannin)

In the last decade, eco products have become all the rage as people make an effort to be kinder to the environment, as well as their wallets.

Some folk however, aren’t happy to stop at solar panels on their roofs, or a hybrid car. Instead they’ve pulled out all the punches in the name of eco living and built some truly innovative houses, which are entirely, or mainly, made out of natural and eco-friendly materials.

The possibilities in what you can use to make a house are endless. Wood and stone are obvious examples, but recycled glass bottles and car tires are also great for insulation.

A lkanet (Alkanna tinctoria) root
Purples to blue gray in an alkaline dyebath. The color is enhanced by adding alcohol extract to premordanted wool or silk in dyebath.

Cochineal (dried bugs ) No mordant gives pinks/magenta. With tin mordant yields reds/oranges. An ammonia afterbath will result in purples.

Myrobalan (Terminalia chebula ) Yellow to black colour. However its importance is that it contains 90% natural tannin. Use as substitute for tannin. Also can use instead of TARA (contains only 50% tannin)

Sponsored Products are advertisements for products sold by merchants on Amazon.com. When you click on a Sponsored Product ad, you will be taken to an Amazon detail page where you can learn more about the product and purchase it.

Dec 06 A practical guide, learn to create an exquisite palette of colours to dye wool, silk, cotton and other materials using flowers, onion skins, bark, roots, walnut shells, and other natural materials. * Knit 'N Style *

Jenny Dean is a linguist, lecturer, and experimental dyer who has a business supplying natural dyes and runs workshops on natural dyeing.

In the last decade, eco products have become all the rage as people make an effort to be kinder to the environment, as well as their wallets.

Some folk however, aren’t happy to stop at solar panels on their roofs, or a hybrid car. Instead they’ve pulled out all the punches in the name of eco living and built some truly innovative houses, which are entirely, or mainly, made out of natural and eco-friendly materials.

The possibilities in what you can use to make a house are endless. Wood and stone are obvious examples, but recycled glass bottles and car tires are also great for insulation.

In the last decade, eco products have become all the rage as people make an effort to be kinder to the environment, as well as their wallets.

Some folk however, aren’t happy to stop at solar panels on their roofs, or a hybrid car. Instead they’ve pulled out all the punches in the name of eco living and built some truly innovative houses, which are entirely, or mainly, made out of natural and eco-friendly materials.

The possibilities in what you can use to make a house are endless. Wood and stone are obvious examples, but recycled glass bottles and car tires are also great for insulation.

A lkanet (Alkanna tinctoria) root
Purples to blue gray in an alkaline dyebath. The color is enhanced by adding alcohol extract to premordanted wool or silk in dyebath.

Cochineal (dried bugs ) No mordant gives pinks/magenta. With tin mordant yields reds/oranges. An ammonia afterbath will result in purples.

Myrobalan (Terminalia chebula ) Yellow to black colour. However its importance is that it contains 90% natural tannin. Use as substitute for tannin. Also can use instead of TARA (contains only 50% tannin)

Sponsored Products are advertisements for products sold by merchants on Amazon.com. When you click on a Sponsored Product ad, you will be taken to an Amazon detail page where you can learn more about the product and purchase it.

Dec 06 A practical guide, learn to create an exquisite palette of colours to dye wool, silk, cotton and other materials using flowers, onion skins, bark, roots, walnut shells, and other natural materials. * Knit 'N Style *

Jenny Dean is a linguist, lecturer, and experimental dyer who has a business supplying natural dyes and runs workshops on natural dyeing.

DROP SPINDLES
How To Make A Drop Spindle
Types of Drop Spindles
Spinning Yarn With a Drop Spindle

SPINNING WHEELS
Selecting the Right Spinning Wheel
Styles of Spinning Wheels
Parts Of The Spinning Wheel
How The Spinning Wheel Works
Adjusting The Spinning Wheel's Tension
Drive Ratios & Twists Per Inch
* Spinning Wheel Maintenance

HANDSPINNING TECHNIQUES
* Basic Yarn Design
Handspinning Woollen and Worsted Yarn
Preparing to Handspin Yarn on the Spinning Wheel
* Basic Handspinning Techniques
Adding On More Fiber
Plying Yarn with a Spinning Wheel
Navajo Plying
Making A Skein of Yarn With A Niddy Noddy
Setting in the Twist of Handspun Yarn
What Do I Do If? ...

Although I had my first dyeing experiments a long time ago, I’ve never tried dyeing with indigo.  Indigo is produced by several different plants, and historically the important one here in Europe was woad (Isatis tinctoria). As the blue pigment in the plant is not water-soluble, the processing it requires is different from the normal natural dyeing process (which is pretty straight-forward and not that different from cooking). Turning the indigo pigment into a format that can be used in dyeing has always seemed a bit complex to me, I’ve always thought it is definitely something for later when I’ve mastered the “normal” dyeing process.

But as I have been growing woad this year, I knew sooner or later I need to learn the method. Growing woad has been reasonably easy although the start wasn’t entirely successful: I first sowed some seeds in self-watering modular trays in my unheated greenhouse, but only four seeds germinated. But I then sowed some more straight into a raised bed outside, around May time, and this worked much better as I soon had nice little rows of woad seedlings growing.

During the summer they have been very trouble-free. I have watered them at particularly hot spells (which there haven’t been that many this summer here in the UK), but that’s about it. I thinned the rows late June/early July time and planted some of the thinnings in plastic pots and they too started growing well. Although I wasn’t sure if the leaves had any blue in them so early in the season, I also put some of the thinnings in plastic bags and stuck them in the freezer, to be used later when I have more leaves (I just couldn’t bear to throw them away).


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