Philip Kindred Dick (December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982) was an American science fiction writer. Dick explored philosophical, social, and political themes in his novels with plots dominated by monopolistic corporations, alternative universes , authoritarian governments , and altered states of consciousness . His work reflected his personal interest in metaphysics and theology , and often drew upon his life experiences in addressing the nature of reality , identity , drug abuse , schizophrenia , and transcendental experiences.

Philip Kindred Dick and his twin sister, Jane Charlotte Dick, were born six weeks prematurely on December 16, 1928, in Chicago , Illinois, to Dorothy (née Kindred; 1900–1978) and Joseph Edgar Dick (1899–1985), who worked for the United States Department of Agriculture . [11] [12] His paternal grandparents were Irish. [13] The death of Jane six weeks later, on January 26, 1929, profoundly affected Philip's life, leading to the recurrent motif of the " phantom twin " in his books. [11]

In 1963, Dick won the Hugo Award for The Man in the High Castle . [2] Although he was hailed as a genius in the science fiction world, the mainstream literary world was unappreciative, and he could publish books only through low-paying science fiction publishers such as Ace . Even in his later years, he continued to have financial troubles. In the introduction to the 1980 short story collection The Golden Man , Dick wrote:

Note : The first five books listed here are the hardcover Subterranean Press collected stories editions listed in chronological order.

Note : If you don’t see the covers and titles above, most likely your ad blocking software/browser extension is not allowing the content from Amazon.com to appear.

Any type of donation would be appreciated: content, PKD-related items, etc. Any questions, email philipkdickfans[at]gmail[dot]com.

Science fiction author Philip K. Dick died a little more than 35 years ago (March 2, 1982) at the age of 53, but he’s still very much alive in the media and the culture. “Phildickian” has even become a word in several online dictionaries, an adjective used to compare things to the shifting realities, paranoia, and nothing-is-as-it-seems trippy nature of his works and his life.

The everything-is-melting ambiance of his fiction explains how this suburban husband and father – five marriages, three children – who was born before the Great Depression built a reputation as a drug user. Some of his writings seemed like LSD visions to the counterculture, but the reputation was not completely warranted.

True, he did experiment with psychedelic drugs, but they weren’t his addiction and had nothing to do with his creative visions. He had a more mundane habit--a need for speed--to help maintain his prolific output and impoverished suburban lifestyle.

Philip Kindred Dick (December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982) was an American science fiction writer. Dick explored philosophical, social, and political themes in his novels with plots dominated by monopolistic corporations, alternative universes , authoritarian governments , and altered states of consciousness . His work reflected his personal interest in metaphysics and theology , and often drew upon his life experiences in addressing the nature of reality , identity , drug abuse , schizophrenia , and transcendental experiences.

Philip Kindred Dick and his twin sister, Jane Charlotte Dick, were born six weeks prematurely on December 16, 1928, in Chicago , Illinois, to Dorothy (née Kindred; 1900–1978) and Joseph Edgar Dick (1899–1985), who worked for the United States Department of Agriculture . [11] [12] His paternal grandparents were Irish. [13] The death of Jane six weeks later, on January 26, 1929, profoundly affected Philip's life, leading to the recurrent motif of the " phantom twin " in his books. [11]

In 1963, Dick won the Hugo Award for The Man in the High Castle . [2] Although he was hailed as a genius in the science fiction world, the mainstream literary world was unappreciative, and he could publish books only through low-paying science fiction publishers such as Ace . Even in his later years, he continued to have financial troubles. In the introduction to the 1980 short story collection The Golden Man , Dick wrote:

Philip Kindred Dick (December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982) was an American science fiction writer. Dick explored philosophical, social, and political themes in his novels with plots dominated by monopolistic corporations, alternative universes , authoritarian governments , and altered states of consciousness . His work reflected his personal interest in metaphysics and theology , and often drew upon his life experiences in addressing the nature of reality , identity , drug abuse , schizophrenia , and transcendental experiences.

Philip Kindred Dick and his twin sister, Jane Charlotte Dick, were born six weeks prematurely on December 16, 1928, in Chicago , Illinois, to Dorothy (née Kindred; 1900–1978) and Joseph Edgar Dick (1899–1985), who worked for the United States Department of Agriculture . [11] [12] His paternal grandparents were Irish. [13] The death of Jane six weeks later, on January 26, 1929, profoundly affected Philip's life, leading to the recurrent motif of the " phantom twin " in his books. [11]

In 1963, Dick won the Hugo Award for The Man in the High Castle . [2] Although he was hailed as a genius in the science fiction world, the mainstream literary world was unappreciative, and he could publish books only through low-paying science fiction publishers such as Ace . Even in his later years, he continued to have financial troubles. In the introduction to the 1980 short story collection The Golden Man , Dick wrote:

Note : The first five books listed here are the hardcover Subterranean Press collected stories editions listed in chronological order.

Note : If you don’t see the covers and titles above, most likely your ad blocking software/browser extension is not allowing the content from Amazon.com to appear.

Any type of donation would be appreciated: content, PKD-related items, etc. Any questions, email philipkdickfans[at]gmail[dot]com.

Science fiction author Philip K. Dick died a little more than 35 years ago (March 2, 1982) at the age of 53, but he’s still very much alive in the media and the culture. “Phildickian” has even become a word in several online dictionaries, an adjective used to compare things to the shifting realities, paranoia, and nothing-is-as-it-seems trippy nature of his works and his life.

The everything-is-melting ambiance of his fiction explains how this suburban husband and father – five marriages, three children – who was born before the Great Depression built a reputation as a drug user. Some of his writings seemed like LSD visions to the counterculture, but the reputation was not completely warranted.

True, he did experiment with psychedelic drugs, but they weren’t his addiction and had nothing to do with his creative visions. He had a more mundane habit--a need for speed--to help maintain his prolific output and impoverished suburban lifestyle.

Звёздные войны. Эпизод 6: Возвращение джедая (1983)
# 76 on IMDb Top Rated Movies »

Henry Cavill »
# 120 on STARmeter

Other Works | Publicity Listings | Official Sites | Contact Info

Philip Kindred Dick (December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982) was an American science fiction writer. Dick explored philosophical, social, and political themes in his novels with plots dominated by monopolistic corporations, alternative universes , authoritarian governments , and altered states of consciousness . His work reflected his personal interest in metaphysics and theology , and often drew upon his life experiences in addressing the nature of reality , identity , drug abuse , schizophrenia , and transcendental experiences.

Philip Kindred Dick and his twin sister, Jane Charlotte Dick, were born six weeks prematurely on December 16, 1928, in Chicago , Illinois, to Dorothy (née Kindred; 1900–1978) and Joseph Edgar Dick (1899–1985), who worked for the United States Department of Agriculture . [11] [12] His paternal grandparents were Irish. [13] The death of Jane six weeks later, on January 26, 1929, profoundly affected Philip's life, leading to the recurrent motif of the " phantom twin " in his books. [11]

In 1963, Dick won the Hugo Award for The Man in the High Castle . [2] Although he was hailed as a genius in the science fiction world, the mainstream literary world was unappreciative, and he could publish books only through low-paying science fiction publishers such as Ace . Even in his later years, he continued to have financial troubles. In the introduction to the 1980 short story collection The Golden Man , Dick wrote:

Note : The first five books listed here are the hardcover Subterranean Press collected stories editions listed in chronological order.

Note : If you don’t see the covers and titles above, most likely your ad blocking software/browser extension is not allowing the content from Amazon.com to appear.

Any type of donation would be appreciated: content, PKD-related items, etc. Any questions, email philipkdickfans[at]gmail[dot]com.

Science fiction author Philip K. Dick died a little more than 35 years ago (March 2, 1982) at the age of 53, but he’s still very much alive in the media and the culture. “Phildickian” has even become a word in several online dictionaries, an adjective used to compare things to the shifting realities, paranoia, and nothing-is-as-it-seems trippy nature of his works and his life.

The everything-is-melting ambiance of his fiction explains how this suburban husband and father – five marriages, three children – who was born before the Great Depression built a reputation as a drug user. Some of his writings seemed like LSD visions to the counterculture, but the reputation was not completely warranted.

True, he did experiment with psychedelic drugs, but they weren’t his addiction and had nothing to do with his creative visions. He had a more mundane habit--a need for speed--to help maintain his prolific output and impoverished suburban lifestyle.

Звёздные войны. Эпизод 6: Возвращение джедая (1983)
# 76 on IMDb Top Rated Movies »

Henry Cavill »
# 120 on STARmeter

Other Works | Publicity Listings | Official Sites | Contact Info

Fortunately for me I read some early Ballard in the ‘70’s before all the hype and surrounding mess over his work Crash , turned into a movie by Cronenberg.
He was called the ‘poet of desolate landscapes ’ for a reason.
( http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/13/books/review/Lethem-t.html )
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._G._Ballard

One of my favorite science fiction writers, along with Thomas Disch (particularly Camp Concentration ) , Philip K. Dick , and other individual books, such as A Canticle For Leibowitz . https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Canticle_for_Leibowitz

Most people will recognize what Spielberg did with his quite wonderful autobiographical work, Empire Of The Sun . Excellent movie, wonderful book.

Philip Kindred Dick (December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982) was an American science fiction writer. Dick explored philosophical, social, and political themes in his novels with plots dominated by monopolistic corporations, alternative universes , authoritarian governments , and altered states of consciousness . His work reflected his personal interest in metaphysics and theology , and often drew upon his life experiences in addressing the nature of reality , identity , drug abuse , schizophrenia , and transcendental experiences.

Philip Kindred Dick and his twin sister, Jane Charlotte Dick, were born six weeks prematurely on December 16, 1928, in Chicago , Illinois, to Dorothy (née Kindred; 1900–1978) and Joseph Edgar Dick (1899–1985), who worked for the United States Department of Agriculture . [11] [12] His paternal grandparents were Irish. [13] The death of Jane six weeks later, on January 26, 1929, profoundly affected Philip's life, leading to the recurrent motif of the " phantom twin " in his books. [11]

In 1963, Dick won the Hugo Award for The Man in the High Castle . [2] Although he was hailed as a genius in the science fiction world, the mainstream literary world was unappreciative, and he could publish books only through low-paying science fiction publishers such as Ace . Even in his later years, he continued to have financial troubles. In the introduction to the 1980 short story collection The Golden Man , Dick wrote:

Note : The first five books listed here are the hardcover Subterranean Press collected stories editions listed in chronological order.

Note : If you don’t see the covers and titles above, most likely your ad blocking software/browser extension is not allowing the content from Amazon.com to appear.

Any type of donation would be appreciated: content, PKD-related items, etc. Any questions, email philipkdickfans[at]gmail[dot]com.


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