Year: 1986
Manufacturer: Kawasaki
Model: GPZ900R A2
Colour: Red / Silver
Engine Size: 908
Gears: Six-speed manual
Start Type: Electric start
Drive Type: Chain

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I too am rebuilding a 1986 GPZ900 but think its an A3 not an A2, how do you tell the difference? I thought the A was tied to the year of Manufacture but probably not huh? What month switched paint jobs? The “pictured” comes up under 1985 and 1986 Gpz900r and I’m struggling to grasp my colour choices?


The 1980s get a bad rap. Music, fashion and hairstyles are all cheap targets—and 1980s motorcycles haven’t fared much better. But if there’s a bike that deserves a second chance, it’s Kawasaki’s blindingly fast GPz900R.

The narrow 16-valve engine was light years ahead of others in the technology stakes, and pumped out 115 bhp from just 908 cc. It was enough to make the GPz900R the first production bike to top 150 mph.


Icon Motosport’s design director Kurt Walter, never afraid to zig when others zag, is a fan. “The GPz was my gateway drug into the subculture of sportbikes. It wasn’t the kind of bike you wanted to marry, but she made for some interesting dates.”

Year: 1986
Manufacturer: Kawasaki
Model: GPZ900R A2
Colour: Red / Silver
Engine Size: 908
Gears: Six-speed manual
Start Type: Electric start
Drive Type: Chain

Australia - Classic Motorcycles For Sale Canada - Classic Motorcycles For Sale Ireland - Classic Motorcycles For Sale UK - Classic Motorcycles For Sale USA - Classic Motorcycles For Sale

I too am rebuilding a 1986 GPZ900 but think its an A3 not an A2, how do you tell the difference? I thought the A was tied to the year of Manufacture but probably not huh? What month switched paint jobs? The “pictured” comes up under 1985 and 1986 Gpz900r and I’m struggling to grasp my colour choices?

Year: 1986
Manufacturer: Kawasaki
Model: GPZ900R A2
Colour: Red / Silver
Engine Size: 908
Gears: Six-speed manual
Start Type: Electric start
Drive Type: Chain

Australia - Classic Motorcycles For Sale Canada - Classic Motorcycles For Sale Ireland - Classic Motorcycles For Sale UK - Classic Motorcycles For Sale USA - Classic Motorcycles For Sale

I too am rebuilding a 1986 GPZ900 but think its an A3 not an A2, how do you tell the difference? I thought the A was tied to the year of Manufacture but probably not huh? What month switched paint jobs? The “pictured” comes up under 1985 and 1986 Gpz900r and I’m struggling to grasp my colour choices?


The 1980s get a bad rap. Music, fashion and hairstyles are all cheap targets—and 1980s motorcycles haven’t fared much better. But if there’s a bike that deserves a second chance, it’s Kawasaki’s blindingly fast GPz900R.

The narrow 16-valve engine was light years ahead of others in the technology stakes, and pumped out 115 bhp from just 908 cc. It was enough to make the GPz900R the first production bike to top 150 mph.


Icon Motosport’s design director Kurt Walter, never afraid to zig when others zag, is a fan. “The GPz was my gateway drug into the subculture of sportbikes. It wasn’t the kind of bike you wanted to marry, but she made for some interesting dates.”

Prior to its design, Kawasaki envisioned producing a sub-liter engine that would be the successor to the Z1 . Although its steel frame, 16-inch front and 18-inch rear wheels, air suspension , and anti-dive forks were fairly standard at that time, the narrow, compact engine was mounted lower in the frame, allowing it to take Japanese superbike performance to a new level. Only three months after being unveiled to the press in December 1983, dealers entered three works GPZ900R bikes in the Isle of Man Production TT finishing in first and second place. [4]

Technical advances included water cooling and 16 valves, allowing additional power, and a frame that used the engine as a stressed member for improved handling and reduced weight, [2] as a result of testing that showed that the standard downtubes carried virtually no weight and can be eliminated. Its top speed gave it the title of the fastest production bike at the time, [2] and standing quarter mile times of 10.976 seconds, [2] or 10.55 seconds recorded by specialist rider Jay "Pee Wee" Gleason. The 1984 GPZ900R was the first Kawasaki bike to be officially marketed (in North America) under the Ninja brand name. [2]

In spite of its performance, the GPZ900R was smooth and ridable in urban traffic, owing to the new suspension and a crankshaft counter-balancer to nearly eliminated secondary vibration. The fairing's aerodynamics combined with good overall ergonomics to make comfortable long-distance riding possible.

Figures shown are for expected accumulated average mileage. Actual miles may differ substantially. Kelley Blue Book does not provide a dollar figure to add or deduct based on mileage for motorcycles. A motorcycle’s condition is far more important than its number of miles driven, since factors like riding style and road conditions will have a far greater impact on a value than the actual mileage.

Actual and average mileage can be hard to determine due to common odometer malfunctions. Kelley Blue Book does not provide a dollar figure to add or deduct based on mileage for motorcycles. A motorcycle’s condition is far more important than its number of miles driven, since factors like riding style and road conditions will have a far greater impact on a value than the actual mileage.

Year: 1986
Manufacturer: Kawasaki
Model: GPZ900R A2
Colour: Red / Silver
Engine Size: 908
Gears: Six-speed manual
Start Type: Electric start
Drive Type: Chain

Australia - Classic Motorcycles For Sale Canada - Classic Motorcycles For Sale Ireland - Classic Motorcycles For Sale UK - Classic Motorcycles For Sale USA - Classic Motorcycles For Sale

I too am rebuilding a 1986 GPZ900 but think its an A3 not an A2, how do you tell the difference? I thought the A was tied to the year of Manufacture but probably not huh? What month switched paint jobs? The “pictured” comes up under 1985 and 1986 Gpz900r and I’m struggling to grasp my colour choices?


The 1980s get a bad rap. Music, fashion and hairstyles are all cheap targets—and 1980s motorcycles haven’t fared much better. But if there’s a bike that deserves a second chance, it’s Kawasaki’s blindingly fast GPz900R.

The narrow 16-valve engine was light years ahead of others in the technology stakes, and pumped out 115 bhp from just 908 cc. It was enough to make the GPz900R the first production bike to top 150 mph.


Icon Motosport’s design director Kurt Walter, never afraid to zig when others zag, is a fan. “The GPz was my gateway drug into the subculture of sportbikes. It wasn’t the kind of bike you wanted to marry, but she made for some interesting dates.”

Prior to its design, Kawasaki envisioned producing a sub-liter engine that would be the successor to the Z1 . Although its steel frame, 16-inch front and 18-inch rear wheels, air suspension , and anti-dive forks were fairly standard at that time, the narrow, compact engine was mounted lower in the frame, allowing it to take Japanese superbike performance to a new level. Only three months after being unveiled to the press in December 1983, dealers entered three works GPZ900R bikes in the Isle of Man Production TT finishing in first and second place. [4]

Technical advances included water cooling and 16 valves, allowing additional power, and a frame that used the engine as a stressed member for improved handling and reduced weight, [2] as a result of testing that showed that the standard downtubes carried virtually no weight and can be eliminated. Its top speed gave it the title of the fastest production bike at the time, [2] and standing quarter mile times of 10.976 seconds, [2] or 10.55 seconds recorded by specialist rider Jay "Pee Wee" Gleason. The 1984 GPZ900R was the first Kawasaki bike to be officially marketed (in North America) under the Ninja brand name. [2]

In spite of its performance, the GPZ900R was smooth and ridable in urban traffic, owing to the new suspension and a crankshaft counter-balancer to nearly eliminated secondary vibration. The fairing's aerodynamics combined with good overall ergonomics to make comfortable long-distance riding possible.


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