It was a call of “ Tora! Tora! Tora! ” that changed history. Just before 8 AM on December 7, 1941, a Japanese fighter pilot named Mitsuo Fuchida ordered those words—indicating that his aerial striking force had arrived to its destination undetected—to be transmitted over the radio. Tora , meaning tiger, was also radio code for “lightning attack,” and as the Japanese warplanes flew over Pearl Harbor in Hawaii, the world was changed forever.

One of the defining moments in US and world history, the attack on Pearl Harbor came as a complete surprise to those in the water and on the ground. Fighter planes, bombers, and torpedoes were launched to wipe out American battleships and cause devastation to thousands of families. The aim of the attack was to stop the US Pacific Fleet from getting in the way of Japan’s plans in other areas of Southeast Asia; and it came as a complete shock to everyone at Pearl Harbor—and around the world—who thought their little island paradise was keeping them well away from any major fighting.

Of the eight battleships that were present in Pearl Harbor, four of them sank to the ocean floor; there were more than 180 aircraft destroyed on the ground, and over two thousand sailors, soldiers, and Marines perished.

For aircraft, the “top speed” is measured at the aircraft’s “critical altitude”—the altitude at which level speed is maximum at full military power. (Military power is the highest power an engine can produce on a sustained basis.) At lower altitudes, air denseness creates more air resistance, slowing the aircraft. At higher altitude, the thinner air keeps the aircraft engine from performing at full power. Sometimes, manufactures also provide a military power speed at Sea Level and occasionally at several altitudes.

Of course, if an attacker is higher than the target, the attacker can gain speed in a dive. In turn, if an attacker has to climb to reach its target, it will be flying slower. Nevertheless, an aircraft’s maximum speed at its critical altitude is the most common single metric for an aircraft’s “speed.”

The Zero was officially the Type 0 Aircraft Carrier Fighter. [1] This base designation was followed by a model number. The first model was Model 11, meaning that it was the first major version of the fuselage and engine. It had fixed wing tips. After 66 aircraft were built, folding wing tips were added to permit more Zeros to fit on aircraft carriers. [2] This second model was the Model 21, to indicate a different fuselage. The Model 21 was used almost exclusively in the first year of the war.

Pearl Harbor was the site of an event that changed not only the United States but the world. December 7th, 1941 marks the fateful day the Japanese launched a surprise attack on the unsuspecting base on the island of Oahu. The shocking offensive left 2,403 dead and over 1,000 wounded. The Japanese onslaught also forced America out of its stance of isolation and into war production, eventually shifting the tide of history in favor of the United States and her allies.

At Pearl Harbor today, visitors have the opportunity to stand directly above the remains of the USS Arizona, one of the ships sunk during the attack. Feel the weight of history as you read the names of the men lost that day and understand that you are standing over their final resting site. Be sure to visit the Battleship Missouri, the ship on which the Japanese signed the Instrument of Surrender that ended World War II. Tours are available daily and include round-trip transportation.

Pearl Harbor is located on the island of Oahu, “The Gathering Place” in the Hawaiian language. Oahu is home to the majority of the 1.42 million inhabitants who reside on the major islands of Hawaii, and offers a unique blend of island beauty and city amenities. Tours are also available that include airfare from the neighbor islands.

In accordance with Yamamoto’s plan, the aircraft carrier strike force commanded by Admiral Nagumo Chuichi sailed eastward undetected by any U.S. reconnaissance until it had reached a point 275 miles north of Hawaii. From there, on…

Adm. Yamamoto Isoroku , the commander in chief of Japan’s Combined Fleet, had planned the attack against the U.S. Pacific Fleet with great care. Once the U.S. fleet was out of action, the way for the unhindered Japanese conquest of all of Southeast Asia and the Indonesian Archipelago would be open. On November 26 a Japanese fleet, under Vice Adm. Nagumo Chuichi and including 6 aircraft carriers, 2 battleships, 3 cruisers, and 11 destroyers, sailed to a point some 275 miles (440 km) north of Hawaii. From there, about 360 planes in total were launched.

In accordance with Yamamoto’s plan, the aircraft carrier strike force commanded by Admiral Nagumo Chuichi sailed eastward undetected by any U.S. reconnaissance until it had reached a point 275 miles north of Hawaii. From there, on…

It was a call of “ Tora! Tora! Tora! ” that changed history. Just before 8 AM on December 7, 1941, a Japanese fighter pilot named Mitsuo Fuchida ordered those words—indicating that his aerial striking force had arrived to its destination undetected—to be transmitted over the radio. Tora , meaning tiger, was also radio code for “lightning attack,” and as the Japanese warplanes flew over Pearl Harbor in Hawaii, the world was changed forever.

One of the defining moments in US and world history, the attack on Pearl Harbor came as a complete surprise to those in the water and on the ground. Fighter planes, bombers, and torpedoes were launched to wipe out American battleships and cause devastation to thousands of families. The aim of the attack was to stop the US Pacific Fleet from getting in the way of Japan’s plans in other areas of Southeast Asia; and it came as a complete shock to everyone at Pearl Harbor—and around the world—who thought their little island paradise was keeping them well away from any major fighting.

Of the eight battleships that were present in Pearl Harbor, four of them sank to the ocean floor; there were more than 180 aircraft destroyed on the ground, and over two thousand sailors, soldiers, and Marines perished.

It was a call of “ Tora! Tora! Tora! ” that changed history. Just before 8 AM on December 7, 1941, a Japanese fighter pilot named Mitsuo Fuchida ordered those words—indicating that his aerial striking force had arrived to its destination undetected—to be transmitted over the radio. Tora , meaning tiger, was also radio code for “lightning attack,” and as the Japanese warplanes flew over Pearl Harbor in Hawaii, the world was changed forever.

One of the defining moments in US and world history, the attack on Pearl Harbor came as a complete surprise to those in the water and on the ground. Fighter planes, bombers, and torpedoes were launched to wipe out American battleships and cause devastation to thousands of families. The aim of the attack was to stop the US Pacific Fleet from getting in the way of Japan’s plans in other areas of Southeast Asia; and it came as a complete shock to everyone at Pearl Harbor—and around the world—who thought their little island paradise was keeping them well away from any major fighting.

Of the eight battleships that were present in Pearl Harbor, four of them sank to the ocean floor; there were more than 180 aircraft destroyed on the ground, and over two thousand sailors, soldiers, and Marines perished.

For aircraft, the “top speed” is measured at the aircraft’s “critical altitude”—the altitude at which level speed is maximum at full military power. (Military power is the highest power an engine can produce on a sustained basis.) At lower altitudes, air denseness creates more air resistance, slowing the aircraft. At higher altitude, the thinner air keeps the aircraft engine from performing at full power. Sometimes, manufactures also provide a military power speed at Sea Level and occasionally at several altitudes.

Of course, if an attacker is higher than the target, the attacker can gain speed in a dive. In turn, if an attacker has to climb to reach its target, it will be flying slower. Nevertheless, an aircraft’s maximum speed at its critical altitude is the most common single metric for an aircraft’s “speed.”

The Zero was officially the Type 0 Aircraft Carrier Fighter. [1] This base designation was followed by a model number. The first model was Model 11, meaning that it was the first major version of the fuselage and engine. It had fixed wing tips. After 66 aircraft were built, folding wing tips were added to permit more Zeros to fit on aircraft carriers. [2] This second model was the Model 21, to indicate a different fuselage. The Model 21 was used almost exclusively in the first year of the war.

It was a call of “ Tora! Tora! Tora! ” that changed history. Just before 8 AM on December 7, 1941, a Japanese fighter pilot named Mitsuo Fuchida ordered those words—indicating that his aerial striking force had arrived to its destination undetected—to be transmitted over the radio. Tora , meaning tiger, was also radio code for “lightning attack,” and as the Japanese warplanes flew over Pearl Harbor in Hawaii, the world was changed forever.

One of the defining moments in US and world history, the attack on Pearl Harbor came as a complete surprise to those in the water and on the ground. Fighter planes, bombers, and torpedoes were launched to wipe out American battleships and cause devastation to thousands of families. The aim of the attack was to stop the US Pacific Fleet from getting in the way of Japan’s plans in other areas of Southeast Asia; and it came as a complete shock to everyone at Pearl Harbor—and around the world—who thought their little island paradise was keeping them well away from any major fighting.

Of the eight battleships that were present in Pearl Harbor, four of them sank to the ocean floor; there were more than 180 aircraft destroyed on the ground, and over two thousand sailors, soldiers, and Marines perished.

For aircraft, the “top speed” is measured at the aircraft’s “critical altitude”—the altitude at which level speed is maximum at full military power. (Military power is the highest power an engine can produce on a sustained basis.) At lower altitudes, air denseness creates more air resistance, slowing the aircraft. At higher altitude, the thinner air keeps the aircraft engine from performing at full power. Sometimes, manufactures also provide a military power speed at Sea Level and occasionally at several altitudes.

Of course, if an attacker is higher than the target, the attacker can gain speed in a dive. In turn, if an attacker has to climb to reach its target, it will be flying slower. Nevertheless, an aircraft’s maximum speed at its critical altitude is the most common single metric for an aircraft’s “speed.”

The Zero was officially the Type 0 Aircraft Carrier Fighter. [1] This base designation was followed by a model number. The first model was Model 11, meaning that it was the first major version of the fuselage and engine. It had fixed wing tips. After 66 aircraft were built, folding wing tips were added to permit more Zeros to fit on aircraft carriers. [2] This second model was the Model 21, to indicate a different fuselage. The Model 21 was used almost exclusively in the first year of the war.

Pearl Harbor was the site of an event that changed not only the United States but the world. December 7th, 1941 marks the fateful day the Japanese launched a surprise attack on the unsuspecting base on the island of Oahu. The shocking offensive left 2,403 dead and over 1,000 wounded. The Japanese onslaught also forced America out of its stance of isolation and into war production, eventually shifting the tide of history in favor of the United States and her allies.

At Pearl Harbor today, visitors have the opportunity to stand directly above the remains of the USS Arizona, one of the ships sunk during the attack. Feel the weight of history as you read the names of the men lost that day and understand that you are standing over their final resting site. Be sure to visit the Battleship Missouri, the ship on which the Japanese signed the Instrument of Surrender that ended World War II. Tours are available daily and include round-trip transportation.

Pearl Harbor is located on the island of Oahu, “The Gathering Place” in the Hawaiian language. Oahu is home to the majority of the 1.42 million inhabitants who reside on the major islands of Hawaii, and offers a unique blend of island beauty and city amenities. Tours are also available that include airfare from the neighbor islands.

In accordance with Yamamoto’s plan, the aircraft carrier strike force commanded by Admiral Nagumo Chuichi sailed eastward undetected by any U.S. reconnaissance until it had reached a point 275 miles north of Hawaii. From there, on…

Adm. Yamamoto Isoroku , the commander in chief of Japan’s Combined Fleet, had planned the attack against the U.S. Pacific Fleet with great care. Once the U.S. fleet was out of action, the way for the unhindered Japanese conquest of all of Southeast Asia and the Indonesian Archipelago would be open. On November 26 a Japanese fleet, under Vice Adm. Nagumo Chuichi and including 6 aircraft carriers, 2 battleships, 3 cruisers, and 11 destroyers, sailed to a point some 275 miles (440 km) north of Hawaii. From there, about 360 planes in total were launched.

In accordance with Yamamoto’s plan, the aircraft carrier strike force commanded by Admiral Nagumo Chuichi sailed eastward undetected by any U.S. reconnaissance until it had reached a point 275 miles north of Hawaii. From there, on…

In the early morning of Dec. 7, 1941, the U.S. naval base at Pearl Harbor , Hawaii, was attacked by the Japanese military. At the time, Japan's military leaders thought the attack would neutralize American forces, allowing Japan to dominate the Asia Pacific region. Instead, the deadly strike drew the U.S. into World War II , making it a truly global conflict. Learn more about the Pearl Harbor attack with these facts related to this memorable day in history.

Pearl Harbor is a natural deepwater naval port on the Hawaiian island of Oahu, located just west of Honolulu. At the time of the attack, Hawaii was an American territory, and the military base at Pearl Harbor was home to the U.S. Navy's Pacific Fleet. 

Japan had embarked on an aggressive campaign of military expansion in Asia, beginning with its invasion of Manchuria (modern-day Korea) in 1931. As the decade progressed, the Japanese military pushed into China and French Indochina (Vietnam) and rapidly built up its armed forces. By the summer of 1941, the U.S. had cut off most trade with Japan to protest that nation's belligerence, and diplomatic relations between the two nations were very tense. Negotiations that November between the U.S. and Japan went nowhere.

It was a call of “ Tora! Tora! Tora! ” that changed history. Just before 8 AM on December 7, 1941, a Japanese fighter pilot named Mitsuo Fuchida ordered those words—indicating that his aerial striking force had arrived to its destination undetected—to be transmitted over the radio. Tora , meaning tiger, was also radio code for “lightning attack,” and as the Japanese warplanes flew over Pearl Harbor in Hawaii, the world was changed forever.

One of the defining moments in US and world history, the attack on Pearl Harbor came as a complete surprise to those in the water and on the ground. Fighter planes, bombers, and torpedoes were launched to wipe out American battleships and cause devastation to thousands of families. The aim of the attack was to stop the US Pacific Fleet from getting in the way of Japan’s plans in other areas of Southeast Asia; and it came as a complete shock to everyone at Pearl Harbor—and around the world—who thought their little island paradise was keeping them well away from any major fighting.

Of the eight battleships that were present in Pearl Harbor, four of them sank to the ocean floor; there were more than 180 aircraft destroyed on the ground, and over two thousand sailors, soldiers, and Marines perished.

For aircraft, the “top speed” is measured at the aircraft’s “critical altitude”—the altitude at which level speed is maximum at full military power. (Military power is the highest power an engine can produce on a sustained basis.) At lower altitudes, air denseness creates more air resistance, slowing the aircraft. At higher altitude, the thinner air keeps the aircraft engine from performing at full power. Sometimes, manufactures also provide a military power speed at Sea Level and occasionally at several altitudes.

Of course, if an attacker is higher than the target, the attacker can gain speed in a dive. In turn, if an attacker has to climb to reach its target, it will be flying slower. Nevertheless, an aircraft’s maximum speed at its critical altitude is the most common single metric for an aircraft’s “speed.”

The Zero was officially the Type 0 Aircraft Carrier Fighter. [1] This base designation was followed by a model number. The first model was Model 11, meaning that it was the first major version of the fuselage and engine. It had fixed wing tips. After 66 aircraft were built, folding wing tips were added to permit more Zeros to fit on aircraft carriers. [2] This second model was the Model 21, to indicate a different fuselage. The Model 21 was used almost exclusively in the first year of the war.

Pearl Harbor was the site of an event that changed not only the United States but the world. December 7th, 1941 marks the fateful day the Japanese launched a surprise attack on the unsuspecting base on the island of Oahu. The shocking offensive left 2,403 dead and over 1,000 wounded. The Japanese onslaught also forced America out of its stance of isolation and into war production, eventually shifting the tide of history in favor of the United States and her allies.

At Pearl Harbor today, visitors have the opportunity to stand directly above the remains of the USS Arizona, one of the ships sunk during the attack. Feel the weight of history as you read the names of the men lost that day and understand that you are standing over their final resting site. Be sure to visit the Battleship Missouri, the ship on which the Japanese signed the Instrument of Surrender that ended World War II. Tours are available daily and include round-trip transportation.

Pearl Harbor is located on the island of Oahu, “The Gathering Place” in the Hawaiian language. Oahu is home to the majority of the 1.42 million inhabitants who reside on the major islands of Hawaii, and offers a unique blend of island beauty and city amenities. Tours are also available that include airfare from the neighbor islands.


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