The Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial in France is located in Colleville-sur-Mer, on the site of the temporary American St. Laurent Cemetery, established by the U.S. First Army on June 8, 1944 as the first American cemetery on European soil in World War II. The cemetery site, at the north end of its half mile access road, covers 172.5 acres and contains the graves of 9,385 of our military dead, most of whom lost their lives in the D-Day landings and ensuing operations. On the Walls of the Missing, in a semicircular garden on the east side of the memorial, are inscribed 1,557 names. Rosettes mark the names of those since recovered and identified.

The memorial consists of a semicircular colonnade with a loggia at each end containing large maps and narratives of the military operations; at the center is the bronze statue, “Spirit of American Youth Rising from the Waves.” An orientation table overlooking the beach depicts the landings in Normandy. Facing west at the memorial, one sees in the foreground the reflecting pool; beyond is the burial area with a circular chapel and, at the far end, granite statues representing the United States and France.

In 2007, the Normandy Visitors Cente r opened. The $30 million visitor center was dedicated by the American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC) on June 6, 2007 during the commemoration of the 63rd Anniversary of D-Day. The center is sited in a wooded area of the cemetery approximately 100 meters east of the Garden of the Missing. In addition to exhibits, the center includes three visitor films: Letters , On Their Shoulders , and Ok, Let's Go . Letters is shown in the auditorium on the lower level of the visitor center every 30 minutes.

A few showers early then a mix of rain and freezing rain overnight. Low 27F. SE winds shifting to N at 15 to 25 mph. Chance of precip 50%.

Creston, Nebraska, natives Henry, left, and Louie Pieper served in the Navy in World War II and died when their ship went down. Louie’s body was found and buried at Normandy. Henry’s wasn’t identified until last year.

Creston, Nebraska, natives Henry, left, and Louie Pieper served in the Navy in World War II and died when their ship went down. Louie’s body was found and buried at Normandy. Henry’s wasn’t identified until last year.

The Normandy Landings began on the 6th June 1944, when 130,000 troops set off from the south coast of England (including some from the port at Bucklers Hard where Nelson's ships had launched 150 years earlier) and landed on the beaches of Normandy. Operation Overlord had begun.

First an air-based landing took place very early in the morning, with both British and American troops being parachuted in to occupied France, followed by a sea-based invasion at 6.30 in the morning. In just that one day 130,000 troops were landed on the Normandy coast at Sword, Juno, Gold, Omaha and Utah beaches.

Despite a great deal of lives lost (50,000 in Calvados alone), these battles represented the turning point of the Second World War in western Europe.

– Image of the landing plan  (1st part – 116th Infantry Regiment)
– Image of the landing plan  (2nd part – 116th Infantry Regiment)

The Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial in France is located in Colleville-sur-Mer, on the site of the temporary American St. Laurent Cemetery, established by the U.S. First Army on June 8, 1944 as the first American cemetery on European soil in World War II. The cemetery site, at the north end of its half mile access road, covers 172.5 acres and contains the graves of 9,385 of our military dead, most of whom lost their lives in the D-Day landings and ensuing operations. On the Walls of the Missing, in a semicircular garden on the east side of the memorial, are inscribed 1,557 names. Rosettes mark the names of those since recovered and identified.

The memorial consists of a semicircular colonnade with a loggia at each end containing large maps and narratives of the military operations; at the center is the bronze statue, “Spirit of American Youth Rising from the Waves.” An orientation table overlooking the beach depicts the landings in Normandy. Facing west at the memorial, one sees in the foreground the reflecting pool; beyond is the burial area with a circular chapel and, at the far end, granite statues representing the United States and France.

In 2007, the Normandy Visitors Cente r opened. The $30 million visitor center was dedicated by the American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC) on June 6, 2007 during the commemoration of the 63rd Anniversary of D-Day. The center is sited in a wooded area of the cemetery approximately 100 meters east of the Garden of the Missing. In addition to exhibits, the center includes three visitor films: Letters , On Their Shoulders , and Ok, Let's Go . Letters is shown in the auditorium on the lower level of the visitor center every 30 minutes.

A few showers early then a mix of rain and freezing rain overnight. Low 27F. SE winds shifting to N at 15 to 25 mph. Chance of precip 50%.

Creston, Nebraska, natives Henry, left, and Louie Pieper served in the Navy in World War II and died when their ship went down. Louie’s body was found and buried at Normandy. Henry’s wasn’t identified until last year.

Creston, Nebraska, natives Henry, left, and Louie Pieper served in the Navy in World War II and died when their ship went down. Louie’s body was found and buried at Normandy. Henry’s wasn’t identified until last year.

The Normandy Landings began on the 6th June 1944, when 130,000 troops set off from the south coast of England (including some from the port at Bucklers Hard where Nelson's ships had launched 150 years earlier) and landed on the beaches of Normandy. Operation Overlord had begun.

First an air-based landing took place very early in the morning, with both British and American troops being parachuted in to occupied France, followed by a sea-based invasion at 6.30 in the morning. In just that one day 130,000 troops were landed on the Normandy coast at Sword, Juno, Gold, Omaha and Utah beaches.

Despite a great deal of lives lost (50,000 in Calvados alone), these battles represented the turning point of the Second World War in western Europe.

The Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial in France is located in Colleville-sur-Mer, on the site of the temporary American St. Laurent Cemetery, established by the U.S. First Army on June 8, 1944 as the first American cemetery on European soil in World War II. The cemetery site, at the north end of its half mile access road, covers 172.5 acres and contains the graves of 9,385 of our military dead, most of whom lost their lives in the D-Day landings and ensuing operations. On the Walls of the Missing, in a semicircular garden on the east side of the memorial, are inscribed 1,557 names. Rosettes mark the names of those since recovered and identified.

The memorial consists of a semicircular colonnade with a loggia at each end containing large maps and narratives of the military operations; at the center is the bronze statue, “Spirit of American Youth Rising from the Waves.” An orientation table overlooking the beach depicts the landings in Normandy. Facing west at the memorial, one sees in the foreground the reflecting pool; beyond is the burial area with a circular chapel and, at the far end, granite statues representing the United States and France.

In 2007, the Normandy Visitors Cente r opened. The $30 million visitor center was dedicated by the American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC) on June 6, 2007 during the commemoration of the 63rd Anniversary of D-Day. The center is sited in a wooded area of the cemetery approximately 100 meters east of the Garden of the Missing. In addition to exhibits, the center includes three visitor films: Letters , On Their Shoulders , and Ok, Let's Go . Letters is shown in the auditorium on the lower level of the visitor center every 30 minutes.

A few showers early then a mix of rain and freezing rain overnight. Low 27F. SE winds shifting to N at 15 to 25 mph. Chance of precip 50%.

Creston, Nebraska, natives Henry, left, and Louie Pieper served in the Navy in World War II and died when their ship went down. Louie’s body was found and buried at Normandy. Henry’s wasn’t identified until last year.

Creston, Nebraska, natives Henry, left, and Louie Pieper served in the Navy in World War II and died when their ship went down. Louie’s body was found and buried at Normandy. Henry’s wasn’t identified until last year.

The Normandy Landings began on the 6th June 1944, when 130,000 troops set off from the south coast of England (including some from the port at Bucklers Hard where Nelson's ships had launched 150 years earlier) and landed on the beaches of Normandy. Operation Overlord had begun.

First an air-based landing took place very early in the morning, with both British and American troops being parachuted in to occupied France, followed by a sea-based invasion at 6.30 in the morning. In just that one day 130,000 troops were landed on the Normandy coast at Sword, Juno, Gold, Omaha and Utah beaches.

Despite a great deal of lives lost (50,000 in Calvados alone), these battles represented the turning point of the Second World War in western Europe.

– Image of the landing plan  (1st part – 116th Infantry Regiment)
– Image of the landing plan  (2nd part – 116th Infantry Regiment)

By browsing this website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies to help us provide you with a better and more personalised service.
Please accept cookies and see our cookie policy here .

The D-Day Landings were the most vital part of the greater Operation Overlord to liberate Europe from years of German military occupation. Allied planning for a massive invasion of German-held France had got underway as early as 1943. The Normandy coast west from the Orne River Estuary to the Cotentin Peninsula was chosen for its flat, firm beaches, and to take the German military off guard – German intelligence thought an Allied invasion would occur much closer to Britain, on France’s most northerly beaches. As plans developed, the Allied commanders, Eisenhower and Montgomery, decided to extend the landing sectors to east and west.

Preparations on a vast scale went on for months in southern England. Through superior air power and a campaign of misinformation, the Allies managed to keep the German military from learning about the build-up to the invasion. However, the Germans had fortified the Normandy coast, particularly after Hitler had put the extremely competent Rommel in charge of coastal defences along the French coast in 1943.

The Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial in France is located in Colleville-sur-Mer, on the site of the temporary American St. Laurent Cemetery, established by the U.S. First Army on June 8, 1944 as the first American cemetery on European soil in World War II. The cemetery site, at the north end of its half mile access road, covers 172.5 acres and contains the graves of 9,385 of our military dead, most of whom lost their lives in the D-Day landings and ensuing operations. On the Walls of the Missing, in a semicircular garden on the east side of the memorial, are inscribed 1,557 names. Rosettes mark the names of those since recovered and identified.

The memorial consists of a semicircular colonnade with a loggia at each end containing large maps and narratives of the military operations; at the center is the bronze statue, “Spirit of American Youth Rising from the Waves.” An orientation table overlooking the beach depicts the landings in Normandy. Facing west at the memorial, one sees in the foreground the reflecting pool; beyond is the burial area with a circular chapel and, at the far end, granite statues representing the United States and France.

In 2007, the Normandy Visitors Cente r opened. The $30 million visitor center was dedicated by the American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC) on June 6, 2007 during the commemoration of the 63rd Anniversary of D-Day. The center is sited in a wooded area of the cemetery approximately 100 meters east of the Garden of the Missing. In addition to exhibits, the center includes three visitor films: Letters , On Their Shoulders , and Ok, Let's Go . Letters is shown in the auditorium on the lower level of the visitor center every 30 minutes.

The Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial in France is located in Colleville-sur-Mer, on the site of the temporary American St. Laurent Cemetery, established by the U.S. First Army on June 8, 1944 as the first American cemetery on European soil in World War II. The cemetery site, at the north end of its half mile access road, covers 172.5 acres and contains the graves of 9,385 of our military dead, most of whom lost their lives in the D-Day landings and ensuing operations. On the Walls of the Missing, in a semicircular garden on the east side of the memorial, are inscribed 1,557 names. Rosettes mark the names of those since recovered and identified.

The memorial consists of a semicircular colonnade with a loggia at each end containing large maps and narratives of the military operations; at the center is the bronze statue, “Spirit of American Youth Rising from the Waves.” An orientation table overlooking the beach depicts the landings in Normandy. Facing west at the memorial, one sees in the foreground the reflecting pool; beyond is the burial area with a circular chapel and, at the far end, granite statues representing the United States and France.

In 2007, the Normandy Visitors Cente r opened. The $30 million visitor center was dedicated by the American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC) on June 6, 2007 during the commemoration of the 63rd Anniversary of D-Day. The center is sited in a wooded area of the cemetery approximately 100 meters east of the Garden of the Missing. In addition to exhibits, the center includes three visitor films: Letters , On Their Shoulders , and Ok, Let's Go . Letters is shown in the auditorium on the lower level of the visitor center every 30 minutes.

A few showers early then a mix of rain and freezing rain overnight. Low 27F. SE winds shifting to N at 15 to 25 mph. Chance of precip 50%.

Creston, Nebraska, natives Henry, left, and Louie Pieper served in the Navy in World War II and died when their ship went down. Louie’s body was found and buried at Normandy. Henry’s wasn’t identified until last year.

Creston, Nebraska, natives Henry, left, and Louie Pieper served in the Navy in World War II and died when their ship went down. Louie’s body was found and buried at Normandy. Henry’s wasn’t identified until last year.


bookmarkyourlink.info
51fGkSyXL9L