ISSN: 2470-6469
eISSN: 2470-2048
Frequency: Quarterly
Published: February, May, August, November

Studies in Late Antiquity  ( SLA ) is a forum for innovation and reflection on global Late Antiquity (150 - 750 CE) which questions and expands on received models and methods. Primary points of interest include interconnections between the Mediterranean and Africa, Iran, Arabia, the Baltic, Scandinavia, the British Isles, China, India and all of Asia, as well as disrupting the assumed connection between the late ancient/Christian Mediterranean and modern, western Europe.

We tend to think of health food as a modern invention, but humans have made the connection between food and well-being at least since the beginning of written history—although it's always been as much a matter of educated guesswork as solid science.

Ancient Greeks believed that good health was dependent on maintaining the balance of the body's four "humors"—black bile, yellow bile, phlegm and blood—and that modifications in diet could restore balance if levels got out of whack. Hippocrates, Plutarch and other thinkers wrote books on the relationship between food and health, including Galen's On the Power of Foods , a title that sounds like it could have been written last year.

​ Belief in garlic's health properties was surprisingly widespread in the ancient world: According to legend , the Egyptian pharaohs fed it to their slaves to increase their strength and productivity (imagine the pungent perspiration of those pyramid-builders), and remnants of garlic were found in the tomb of King Tutankhamen.

Classical antiquity (also the classical era , classical period or classical age ) is the long period of cultural history centered on the Mediterranean Sea , comprising the interlocking civilizations of ancient Greece and ancient Rome , collectively known as the Greco-Roman world . It is the period in which Greek and Roman society flourished and wielded great influence throughout Europe , North Africa and Western Asia .

Conventionally, it is taken to begin with the earliest-recorded Epic Greek poetry of Homer (8th–7th century BC), and continues through the emergence of Christianity and the decline of the Roman Empire (5th century AD). It ends with the dissolution of classical culture at the close of Late Antiquity (300–600), blending into the Early Middle Ages (600–1000). Such a wide sampling of history and territory covers many disparate cultures and periods. "Classical antiquity" may refer also to an idealised vision among later people of what was, in Edgar Allan Poe 's words, "the glory that was Greece, and the grandeur that was Rome." [1]

The earliest period of classical antiquity takes place before the background of gradual re-appearance of historical sources following the Bronze Age collapse . The 8th and 7th centuries BC are still largely proto-historical , with the earliest Greek alphabetic inscriptions appearing in the first half of the 8th century. Homer is usually assumed to have lived in the 8th or 7th century BC, and his lifetime is often taken as marking the beginning of classical antiquity. In the same period falls the traditional date for the establishment of the Ancient Olympic Games , in 776 BC.

ISSN: 2470-6469
eISSN: 2470-2048
Frequency: Quarterly
Published: February, May, August, November

Studies in Late Antiquity  ( SLA ) is a forum for innovation and reflection on global Late Antiquity (150 - 750 CE) which questions and expands on received models and methods. Primary points of interest include interconnections between the Mediterranean and Africa, Iran, Arabia, the Baltic, Scandinavia, the British Isles, China, India and all of Asia, as well as disrupting the assumed connection between the late ancient/Christian Mediterranean and modern, western Europe.

We tend to think of health food as a modern invention, but humans have made the connection between food and well-being at least since the beginning of written history—although it's always been as much a matter of educated guesswork as solid science.

Ancient Greeks believed that good health was dependent on maintaining the balance of the body's four "humors"—black bile, yellow bile, phlegm and blood—and that modifications in diet could restore balance if levels got out of whack. Hippocrates, Plutarch and other thinkers wrote books on the relationship between food and health, including Galen's On the Power of Foods , a title that sounds like it could have been written last year.

​ Belief in garlic's health properties was surprisingly widespread in the ancient world: According to legend , the Egyptian pharaohs fed it to their slaves to increase their strength and productivity (imagine the pungent perspiration of those pyramid-builders), and remnants of garlic were found in the tomb of King Tutankhamen.

Classical antiquity (also the classical era , classical period or classical age ) is the long period of cultural history centered on the Mediterranean Sea , comprising the interlocking civilizations of ancient Greece and ancient Rome , collectively known as the Greco-Roman world . It is the period in which Greek and Roman society flourished and wielded great influence throughout Europe , North Africa and Western Asia .

Conventionally, it is taken to begin with the earliest-recorded Epic Greek poetry of Homer (8th–7th century BC), and continues through the emergence of Christianity and the decline of the Roman Empire (5th century AD). It ends with the dissolution of classical culture at the close of Late Antiquity (300–600), blending into the Early Middle Ages (600–1000). Such a wide sampling of history and territory covers many disparate cultures and periods. "Classical antiquity" may refer also to an idealised vision among later people of what was, in Edgar Allan Poe 's words, "the glory that was Greece, and the grandeur that was Rome." [1]

The earliest period of classical antiquity takes place before the background of gradual re-appearance of historical sources following the Bronze Age collapse . The 8th and 7th centuries BC are still largely proto-historical , with the earliest Greek alphabetic inscriptions appearing in the first half of the 8th century. Homer is usually assumed to have lived in the 8th or 7th century BC, and his lifetime is often taken as marking the beginning of classical antiquity. In the same period falls the traditional date for the establishment of the Ancient Olympic Games , in 776 BC.

For a time the Senate, representing the ancient and threatened order of things, was strong enough to overcome every popular leader that arose, until Julius Caesar supported by an army which he had led in an unparalleled career of conquest, and by the famished masses which he won by his lavish liberality, and skilled beyond all other men in the imperial art of governing, converted the Republic into a Monarchy by a series of measures that were neither violent nor injurious.

To them, indeed, may be tracked nearly all the errors that are undermining political society—Communism, Utilitarianism, the confusion between tyranny and authority, and between lawlessness and freedom.

Although the doctrine of self-reliance and self-denial, which is the foundation of political economy, was written as legibly in the New Testament as in the  Wealth of Nations,  it was not recognised until our age. Tertullian boasts of the passive obedience of the Christians. Melito writes to a pagan Emperor as if he were incapable of giving an unjust command; and in Christian times Optatus thought that whoever presumed to find fault with his sovereign exalted himself almost to the level of a god. But this political quietism was not universal. Origen, the ablest writer of early times, spoke with approval of conspiring for the destruction of tyranny.

ISSN: 2470-6469
eISSN: 2470-2048
Frequency: Quarterly
Published: February, May, August, November

Studies in Late Antiquity  ( SLA ) is a forum for innovation and reflection on global Late Antiquity (150 - 750 CE) which questions and expands on received models and methods. Primary points of interest include interconnections between the Mediterranean and Africa, Iran, Arabia, the Baltic, Scandinavia, the British Isles, China, India and all of Asia, as well as disrupting the assumed connection between the late ancient/Christian Mediterranean and modern, western Europe.

We tend to think of health food as a modern invention, but humans have made the connection between food and well-being at least since the beginning of written history—although it's always been as much a matter of educated guesswork as solid science.

Ancient Greeks believed that good health was dependent on maintaining the balance of the body's four "humors"—black bile, yellow bile, phlegm and blood—and that modifications in diet could restore balance if levels got out of whack. Hippocrates, Plutarch and other thinkers wrote books on the relationship between food and health, including Galen's On the Power of Foods , a title that sounds like it could have been written last year.

​ Belief in garlic's health properties was surprisingly widespread in the ancient world: According to legend , the Egyptian pharaohs fed it to their slaves to increase their strength and productivity (imagine the pungent perspiration of those pyramid-builders), and remnants of garlic were found in the tomb of King Tutankhamen.

ISSN: 2470-6469
eISSN: 2470-2048
Frequency: Quarterly
Published: February, May, August, November

Studies in Late Antiquity  ( SLA ) is a forum for innovation and reflection on global Late Antiquity (150 - 750 CE) which questions and expands on received models and methods. Primary points of interest include interconnections between the Mediterranean and Africa, Iran, Arabia, the Baltic, Scandinavia, the British Isles, China, India and all of Asia, as well as disrupting the assumed connection between the late ancient/Christian Mediterranean and modern, western Europe.

ISSN: 2470-6469
eISSN: 2470-2048
Frequency: Quarterly
Published: February, May, August, November

Studies in Late Antiquity  ( SLA ) is a forum for innovation and reflection on global Late Antiquity (150 - 750 CE) which questions and expands on received models and methods. Primary points of interest include interconnections between the Mediterranean and Africa, Iran, Arabia, the Baltic, Scandinavia, the British Isles, China, India and all of Asia, as well as disrupting the assumed connection between the late ancient/Christian Mediterranean and modern, western Europe.

We tend to think of health food as a modern invention, but humans have made the connection between food and well-being at least since the beginning of written history—although it's always been as much a matter of educated guesswork as solid science.

Ancient Greeks believed that good health was dependent on maintaining the balance of the body's four "humors"—black bile, yellow bile, phlegm and blood—and that modifications in diet could restore balance if levels got out of whack. Hippocrates, Plutarch and other thinkers wrote books on the relationship between food and health, including Galen's On the Power of Foods , a title that sounds like it could have been written last year.

​ Belief in garlic's health properties was surprisingly widespread in the ancient world: According to legend , the Egyptian pharaohs fed it to their slaves to increase their strength and productivity (imagine the pungent perspiration of those pyramid-builders), and remnants of garlic were found in the tomb of King Tutankhamen.

Classical antiquity (also the classical era , classical period or classical age ) is the long period of cultural history centered on the Mediterranean Sea , comprising the interlocking civilizations of ancient Greece and ancient Rome , collectively known as the Greco-Roman world . It is the period in which Greek and Roman society flourished and wielded great influence throughout Europe , North Africa and Western Asia .

Conventionally, it is taken to begin with the earliest-recorded Epic Greek poetry of Homer (8th–7th century BC), and continues through the emergence of Christianity and the decline of the Roman Empire (5th century AD). It ends with the dissolution of classical culture at the close of Late Antiquity (300–600), blending into the Early Middle Ages (600–1000). Such a wide sampling of history and territory covers many disparate cultures and periods. "Classical antiquity" may refer also to an idealised vision among later people of what was, in Edgar Allan Poe 's words, "the glory that was Greece, and the grandeur that was Rome." [1]

The earliest period of classical antiquity takes place before the background of gradual re-appearance of historical sources following the Bronze Age collapse . The 8th and 7th centuries BC are still largely proto-historical , with the earliest Greek alphabetic inscriptions appearing in the first half of the 8th century. Homer is usually assumed to have lived in the 8th or 7th century BC, and his lifetime is often taken as marking the beginning of classical antiquity. In the same period falls the traditional date for the establishment of the Ancient Olympic Games , in 776 BC.

For a time the Senate, representing the ancient and threatened order of things, was strong enough to overcome every popular leader that arose, until Julius Caesar supported by an army which he had led in an unparalleled career of conquest, and by the famished masses which he won by his lavish liberality, and skilled beyond all other men in the imperial art of governing, converted the Republic into a Monarchy by a series of measures that were neither violent nor injurious.

To them, indeed, may be tracked nearly all the errors that are undermining political society—Communism, Utilitarianism, the confusion between tyranny and authority, and between lawlessness and freedom.

Although the doctrine of self-reliance and self-denial, which is the foundation of political economy, was written as legibly in the New Testament as in the  Wealth of Nations,  it was not recognised until our age. Tertullian boasts of the passive obedience of the Christians. Melito writes to a pagan Emperor as if he were incapable of giving an unjust command; and in Christian times Optatus thought that whoever presumed to find fault with his sovereign exalted himself almost to the level of a god. But this political quietism was not universal. Origen, the ablest writer of early times, spoke with approval of conspiring for the destruction of tyranny.

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