The diagnosis of type 2 diabetes is becoming more common in U.S. kids and teens, especially in those who are overweight. Some studies report that between 8% and 45% of children who've been newly diagnosed with diabetes have the form known as type 2.

Diabetes is a chronic condition that needs close attention, but with some practical knowledge, you can become your child's most important partner in learning to live with the disease.

Our bodies break down the foods we eat into glucose and other nutrients needed to fuel body functions, which are then absorbed into the bloodstream from the gastrointestinal tract. The glucose level in the blood rises after a meal and triggers the pancreas to make the hormone insulin and release it into the bloodstream. But in people with diabetes, the body either can't make or can't respond to insulin properly.

Type 2 diabetes occurs when the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin to maintain a normal blood glucose level, or the body is unable to use the insulin that is produced (insulin resistance).

The pancreas is a large gland behind the stomach that produces the hormone insulin. Insulin moves glucose from your blood into your cells, where it's converted into energy.

People of south Asian and African-Caribbean origin also have an increased risk of developing complications of diabetes , such as heart disease, at a younger age than the rest of the population.

Your tax-deductible gift today can fund critical diabetes research and support vital diabetes education services that improve the lives of those with diabetes.

Nearly 30 million battle diabetes and every 23 seconds someone new is diagnosed. Diabetes causes more deaths a year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. Your gift today will help us get closer to curing diabetes and better treatments for those living with diabetes.

In type 2 diabetes, your body does not use insulin properly. This is called insulin resistance. At first, the pancreas makes extra insulin to make up for it. But, over time your pancreas isn’t able to keep up and can’t make enough insulin to keep your blood glucose levels normal. Type 2 is treated with lifestyle changes, oral medications (pills), and insulin.

If you’ve recently been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes or are just looking for better diabetes management, here are some resources to point you in the right direction. Know that you aren’t alone and managing diabetes can be challenging. Learn more on how you can gain control and improve your health living with Type 2.

Looking for a place to talk to others about managing Type 2 diabetes? Visit Tudiabetes  (in English) or  Estudiabetes (en español). You’ll be able to ask questions, share hacks and the moments of inspiration that help you or a family member thrive with Type 2.

Dealing with a diabetes diagnosis is hard enough and blaming yourself does not help. Learn that you are not alone and how to manage this emotionally impacting health reality.

The diagnosis of type 2 diabetes is becoming more common in U.S. kids and teens, especially in those who are overweight. Some studies report that between 8% and 45% of children who've been newly diagnosed with diabetes have the form known as type 2.

Diabetes is a chronic condition that needs close attention, but with some practical knowledge, you can become your child's most important partner in learning to live with the disease.

Our bodies break down the foods we eat into glucose and other nutrients needed to fuel body functions, which are then absorbed into the bloodstream from the gastrointestinal tract. The glucose level in the blood rises after a meal and triggers the pancreas to make the hormone insulin and release it into the bloodstream. But in people with diabetes, the body either can't make or can't respond to insulin properly.

The diagnosis of type 2 diabetes is becoming more common in U.S. kids and teens, especially in those who are overweight. Some studies report that between 8% and 45% of children who've been newly diagnosed with diabetes have the form known as type 2.

Diabetes is a chronic condition that needs close attention, but with some practical knowledge, you can become your child's most important partner in learning to live with the disease.

Our bodies break down the foods we eat into glucose and other nutrients needed to fuel body functions, which are then absorbed into the bloodstream from the gastrointestinal tract. The glucose level in the blood rises after a meal and triggers the pancreas to make the hormone insulin and release it into the bloodstream. But in people with diabetes, the body either can't make or can't respond to insulin properly.

Type 2 diabetes occurs when the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin to maintain a normal blood glucose level, or the body is unable to use the insulin that is produced (insulin resistance).

The pancreas is a large gland behind the stomach that produces the hormone insulin. Insulin moves glucose from your blood into your cells, where it's converted into energy.

People of south Asian and African-Caribbean origin also have an increased risk of developing complications of diabetes , such as heart disease, at a younger age than the rest of the population.

The diagnosis of type 2 diabetes is becoming more common in U.S. kids and teens, especially in those who are overweight. Some studies report that between 8% and 45% of children who've been newly diagnosed with diabetes have the form known as type 2.

Diabetes is a chronic condition that needs close attention, but with some practical knowledge, you can become your child's most important partner in learning to live with the disease.

Our bodies break down the foods we eat into glucose and other nutrients needed to fuel body functions, which are then absorbed into the bloodstream from the gastrointestinal tract. The glucose level in the blood rises after a meal and triggers the pancreas to make the hormone insulin and release it into the bloodstream. But in people with diabetes, the body either can't make or can't respond to insulin properly.

Type 2 diabetes occurs when the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin to maintain a normal blood glucose level, or the body is unable to use the insulin that is produced (insulin resistance).

The pancreas is a large gland behind the stomach that produces the hormone insulin. Insulin moves glucose from your blood into your cells, where it's converted into energy.

People of south Asian and African-Caribbean origin also have an increased risk of developing complications of diabetes , such as heart disease, at a younger age than the rest of the population.

Your tax-deductible gift today can fund critical diabetes research and support vital diabetes education services that improve the lives of those with diabetes.

Nearly 30 million battle diabetes and every 23 seconds someone new is diagnosed. Diabetes causes more deaths a year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. Your gift today will help us get closer to curing diabetes and better treatments for those living with diabetes.

In type 2 diabetes, your body does not use insulin properly. This is called insulin resistance. At first, the pancreas makes extra insulin to make up for it. But, over time your pancreas isn’t able to keep up and can’t make enough insulin to keep your blood glucose levels normal. Type 2 is treated with lifestyle changes, oral medications (pills), and insulin.

If you’ve recently been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes or are just looking for better diabetes management, here are some resources to point you in the right direction. Know that you aren’t alone and managing diabetes can be challenging. Learn more on how you can gain control and improve your health living with Type 2.

Looking for a place to talk to others about managing Type 2 diabetes? Visit Tudiabetes  (in English) or  Estudiabetes (en español). You’ll be able to ask questions, share hacks and the moments of inspiration that help you or a family member thrive with Type 2.

Dealing with a diabetes diagnosis is hard enough and blaming yourself does not help. Learn that you are not alone and how to manage this emotionally impacting health reality.

Diabetes is a chronic, often debilitating and sometimes fatal disease, in which the body either cannot produce insulin or cannot properly use the insulin it produces. Insulin is a hormone that controls the amount of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Diabetes leads to high blood sugar levels, which can damage organs, blood vessels and nerves. The body needs insulin to use sugar as an energy source.

The pancreas is an organ that sits behind the stomach and releases hormones into the digestive system. In the healthy body, when blood sugar levels get too high, special cells in the pancreas (called beta cells) release insulin. Insulin is a hormone and it causes cells to take in sugar to use as energy or to store as fat. This causes blood sugar levels to go back down.

Type 1 diabetes occurs when the immune system mistakenly attacks and kills the beta cells of the pancreas. No, or very little, insulin is released into the body. As a result, sugar builds up in the blood instead of being used as energy. About five to 10 per cent of people with diabetes have type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes generally develops in childhood or adolescence, but can develop in adulthood.

The diagnosis of type 2 diabetes is becoming more common in U.S. kids and teens, especially in those who are overweight. Some studies report that between 8% and 45% of children who've been newly diagnosed with diabetes have the form known as type 2.

Diabetes is a chronic condition that needs close attention, but with some practical knowledge, you can become your child's most important partner in learning to live with the disease.

Our bodies break down the foods we eat into glucose and other nutrients needed to fuel body functions, which are then absorbed into the bloodstream from the gastrointestinal tract. The glucose level in the blood rises after a meal and triggers the pancreas to make the hormone insulin and release it into the bloodstream. But in people with diabetes, the body either can't make or can't respond to insulin properly.

Type 2 diabetes occurs when the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin to maintain a normal blood glucose level, or the body is unable to use the insulin that is produced (insulin resistance).

The pancreas is a large gland behind the stomach that produces the hormone insulin. Insulin moves glucose from your blood into your cells, where it's converted into energy.

People of south Asian and African-Caribbean origin also have an increased risk of developing complications of diabetes , such as heart disease, at a younger age than the rest of the population.

Your tax-deductible gift today can fund critical diabetes research and support vital diabetes education services that improve the lives of those with diabetes.

Nearly 30 million battle diabetes and every 23 seconds someone new is diagnosed. Diabetes causes more deaths a year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. Your gift today will help us get closer to curing diabetes and better treatments for those living with diabetes.

In type 2 diabetes, your body does not use insulin properly. This is called insulin resistance. At first, the pancreas makes extra insulin to make up for it. But, over time your pancreas isn’t able to keep up and can’t make enough insulin to keep your blood glucose levels normal. Type 2 is treated with lifestyle changes, oral medications (pills), and insulin.


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