Her name, to which various people had recently been appending curses, was Ael i-Mhiessan t'Rllaillieu. Her rank, in the common tongue, was khre'Riov: comander-general. Her serial number was a string of sixteen characters that by now she knew as well as she knew her fourth name, though they meant infinitely less to her. And considering these matters in such a fashion was at least marginally appropriate just now, for she was in a trap.

At the moment her patience was mostly intact, but her spirit had moved her to rattle the bars of the cage a bit. Ael propped her elbow on her desk, rested her chin on her hand, and said to her cabin's wall screen, Hwaveyiir. Erein tr'Khaell.

The screen flicked on, and there was the Bridge, and poor Ante-centurion tr'Khaell just as he had been twenty minutes ago, still hunched over and pretending to fiddle with his communications boards. At the sight of Ael he straightened quickly and said, Ie, khre'Riov?

Take Abu al-Abbas, commander of the largest Salafi force inside the Popular Resistance, which backs the Yemeni government. For three years his fighters have been armed and paid for by Saudi Arabia and the UAE.

But last month he was designated  an al-Qaeda  and Islamic State supporter by Saudi, its Gulf allies, Qatar and the US in a move which threatens to split the fragile pro-government alliance.



Abu al-Abbas, real name Adil Abduh Fari, interviewed in December 2016 (screengrab) The incident indicates the delicate interests which bind together partners within the conflict – and nowhere is this more evident than with the role of al-Qaeda on the battlefield.

Her name, to which various people had recently been appending curses, was Ael i-Mhiessan t'Rllaillieu. Her rank, in the common tongue, was khre'Riov: comander-general. Her serial number was a string of sixteen characters that by now she knew as well as she knew her fourth name, though they meant infinitely less to her. And considering these matters in such a fashion was at least marginally appropriate just now, for she was in a trap.

At the moment her patience was mostly intact, but her spirit had moved her to rattle the bars of the cage a bit. Ael propped her elbow on her desk, rested her chin on her hand, and said to her cabin's wall screen, Hwaveyiir. Erein tr'Khaell.

The screen flicked on, and there was the Bridge, and poor Ante-centurion tr'Khaell just as he had been twenty minutes ago, still hunched over and pretending to fiddle with his communications boards. At the sight of Ael he straightened quickly and said, Ie, khre'Riov?

Take Abu al-Abbas, commander of the largest Salafi force inside the Popular Resistance, which backs the Yemeni government. For three years his fighters have been armed and paid for by Saudi Arabia and the UAE.

But last month he was designated  an al-Qaeda  and Islamic State supporter by Saudi, its Gulf allies, Qatar and the US in a move which threatens to split the fragile pro-government alliance.



Abu al-Abbas, real name Adil Abduh Fari, interviewed in December 2016 (screengrab) The incident indicates the delicate interests which bind together partners within the conflict – and nowhere is this more evident than with the role of al-Qaeda on the battlefield.

To celebrate the release of Star Trek: Into Darkness this month, we’ll be running through the first season of the classic Star Trek all this month. Check back daily to get ready to boldly go. It’s only logical.

We’ll be supplementing our coverage of the episodes with some additional materials – mainly novels and comics and films. This is one such entry.

1984 was a hell of a year of Star Trek tie-in novels. John M. Ford’s The Final Reflection was published in May 1984. It was followed by a tie-in adaptation of Star Trek III: The Search for Spock , but the very next original novel would by My Enemy, My Ally by Diane Duane. Both novels feel like kindred spirits, really pushing the boundaries of what you could do with Star Trek tie-in novels.

Her name, to which various people had recently been appending curses, was Ael i-Mhiessan t'Rllaillieu. Her rank, in the common tongue, was khre'Riov: comander-general. Her serial number was a string of sixteen characters that by now she knew as well as she knew her fourth name, though they meant infinitely less to her. And considering these matters in such a fashion was at least marginally appropriate just now, for she was in a trap.

At the moment her patience was mostly intact, but her spirit had moved her to rattle the bars of the cage a bit. Ael propped her elbow on her desk, rested her chin on her hand, and said to her cabin's wall screen, Hwaveyiir. Erein tr'Khaell.

The screen flicked on, and there was the Bridge, and poor Ante-centurion tr'Khaell just as he had been twenty minutes ago, still hunched over and pretending to fiddle with his communications boards. At the sight of Ael he straightened quickly and said, Ie, khre'Riov?

Take Abu al-Abbas, commander of the largest Salafi force inside the Popular Resistance, which backs the Yemeni government. For three years his fighters have been armed and paid for by Saudi Arabia and the UAE.

But last month he was designated  an al-Qaeda  and Islamic State supporter by Saudi, its Gulf allies, Qatar and the US in a move which threatens to split the fragile pro-government alliance.



Abu al-Abbas, real name Adil Abduh Fari, interviewed in December 2016 (screengrab) The incident indicates the delicate interests which bind together partners within the conflict – and nowhere is this more evident than with the role of al-Qaeda on the battlefield.

To celebrate the release of Star Trek: Into Darkness this month, we’ll be running through the first season of the classic Star Trek all this month. Check back daily to get ready to boldly go. It’s only logical.

We’ll be supplementing our coverage of the episodes with some additional materials – mainly novels and comics and films. This is one such entry.

1984 was a hell of a year of Star Trek tie-in novels. John M. Ford’s The Final Reflection was published in May 1984. It was followed by a tie-in adaptation of Star Trek III: The Search for Spock , but the very next original novel would by My Enemy, My Ally by Diane Duane. Both novels feel like kindred spirits, really pushing the boundaries of what you could do with Star Trek tie-in novels.

To enjoy an optimal experience on this website, please update your browser or download Firefox , a free, modern browser .

We are not living in a season of peace. Thinking Christians must surely be aware that a great moral and spiritual conflict is taking shape all around us, with multiple fronts of battle and issues of great importance at stake. The prophet Jeremiah repeatedly warned of those who would falsely declare peace when there is no peace. The Bible defines the Christian life in terms of spiritual battle, and believers in this generation face the fact that the very existence of truth is at stake in our current struggle.

The condition of warfare brings a unique set of moral challenges to the table, and the great moral and cultural battles of our times are no different. Even ancient thinkers knew this, and many of their maxims of warfare are still commonly cited. Among the most popular of these is a maxim that was known by many of the ancients—“the enemy of my enemy is my friend.”

Her name, to which various people had recently been appending curses, was Ael i-Mhiessan t'Rllaillieu. Her rank, in the common tongue, was khre'Riov: comander-general. Her serial number was a string of sixteen characters that by now she knew as well as she knew her fourth name, though they meant infinitely less to her. And considering these matters in such a fashion was at least marginally appropriate just now, for she was in a trap.

At the moment her patience was mostly intact, but her spirit had moved her to rattle the bars of the cage a bit. Ael propped her elbow on her desk, rested her chin on her hand, and said to her cabin's wall screen, Hwaveyiir. Erein tr'Khaell.

The screen flicked on, and there was the Bridge, and poor Ante-centurion tr'Khaell just as he had been twenty minutes ago, still hunched over and pretending to fiddle with his communications boards. At the sight of Ael he straightened quickly and said, Ie, khre'Riov?

Take Abu al-Abbas, commander of the largest Salafi force inside the Popular Resistance, which backs the Yemeni government. For three years his fighters have been armed and paid for by Saudi Arabia and the UAE.

But last month he was designated  an al-Qaeda  and Islamic State supporter by Saudi, its Gulf allies, Qatar and the US in a move which threatens to split the fragile pro-government alliance.



Abu al-Abbas, real name Adil Abduh Fari, interviewed in December 2016 (screengrab) The incident indicates the delicate interests which bind together partners within the conflict – and nowhere is this more evident than with the role of al-Qaeda on the battlefield.

To celebrate the release of Star Trek: Into Darkness this month, we’ll be running through the first season of the classic Star Trek all this month. Check back daily to get ready to boldly go. It’s only logical.

We’ll be supplementing our coverage of the episodes with some additional materials – mainly novels and comics and films. This is one such entry.

1984 was a hell of a year of Star Trek tie-in novels. John M. Ford’s The Final Reflection was published in May 1984. It was followed by a tie-in adaptation of Star Trek III: The Search for Spock , but the very next original novel would by My Enemy, My Ally by Diane Duane. Both novels feel like kindred spirits, really pushing the boundaries of what you could do with Star Trek tie-in novels.

To enjoy an optimal experience on this website, please update your browser or download Firefox , a free, modern browser .

We are not living in a season of peace. Thinking Christians must surely be aware that a great moral and spiritual conflict is taking shape all around us, with multiple fronts of battle and issues of great importance at stake. The prophet Jeremiah repeatedly warned of those who would falsely declare peace when there is no peace. The Bible defines the Christian life in terms of spiritual battle, and believers in this generation face the fact that the very existence of truth is at stake in our current struggle.

The condition of warfare brings a unique set of moral challenges to the table, and the great moral and cultural battles of our times are no different. Even ancient thinkers knew this, and many of their maxims of warfare are still commonly cited. Among the most popular of these is a maxim that was known by many of the ancients—“the enemy of my enemy is my friend.”

Akksul threw his pistol down, choking on a breath. He had shot Jaal. He was a fellow angaran, not an alien. Not a threat... he was a friend, once .

Akksul stood impatiently, unseen among the luscious fronds and winding vines of Havaarl, watching the different aliens coming and going from what was once a thriving daar of his people. He frowned deeply, mentally naming each kind he saw: a sari, turian, salarian. ….human…

He had recently watched the vids celebrating the success of the joint venture of allies against the archon. Many races banded together to fight the kett, which ended in the death of their leader at the place called Meridian. An impressive feat, he grudgingly admitted, no matter his personal opinion of the Milky Way aliens. He could not control his shock however, when he saw Jaal and the pathfinder embracing and kissing like lovers for all to see. He had heard rumors prior to that, but he had given no credence to it, thinking the whole idea ridiculous.

Her name, to which various people had recently been appending curses, was Ael i-Mhiessan t'Rllaillieu. Her rank, in the common tongue, was khre'Riov: comander-general. Her serial number was a string of sixteen characters that by now she knew as well as she knew her fourth name, though they meant infinitely less to her. And considering these matters in such a fashion was at least marginally appropriate just now, for she was in a trap.

At the moment her patience was mostly intact, but her spirit had moved her to rattle the bars of the cage a bit. Ael propped her elbow on her desk, rested her chin on her hand, and said to her cabin's wall screen, Hwaveyiir. Erein tr'Khaell.

The screen flicked on, and there was the Bridge, and poor Ante-centurion tr'Khaell just as he had been twenty minutes ago, still hunched over and pretending to fiddle with his communications boards. At the sight of Ael he straightened quickly and said, Ie, khre'Riov?


bookmarkyourlink.info
51YKWLkCQEL