Here’s how to make a comic book: Scribble some pictures, fill it with noisy colors and slap in some dialogue. Right? Wrong, says Allen Passalaqua, a comic book color artist who’s worked for DC Comics and Valiant. You can take his word for it — he just pulled an all-nighter obsessing over hues, tints, tones and shades. And he’ll be the first to tell you: This isn’t child’s play.

Peeking behind the scenes might take away the magic of comic books for some, but a comic book can’t exist without all its moving cogwheels — like, say, a gripping plot or a captivating image, says Jim Zub, a comic writer who’s freelanced for Marvel, Hasbro and Cartoon Network, among others. Because if everyone’s done their job right, “you’re caught up in the performance of it all.”

In 1993, a charismatic religious leader captured the attention of the world, as the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms stormed his compound. 

After a re-watch of The Dark Knight recently it struck me how brilliantly sad it was when The Joker explains to Batman that they’ll “do this dance forever," not only within the context of the narrative but outside of it, as we’d never see Heath Ledger do that dance again. It made me think about those quieter moments in our fan-boy favourites that punch us in the guts and force us to look to the ceiling so our friends don’t spot the tears rolling down our cheeks (I’m looking at you, death-of-Big-Daddy.)

Tone is a quality of color. It has to do with whether a color is perceived as warm or cold, bright or dull, light or dark, and pure or "dirty." The tone of a piece of art can do a variety of things, from setting the mood to adding emphasis .

You've most likely heard the phrase "Tone it down." In art, this means to make a color, or an overall color scheme, less vibrant. Conversely, "toning it up" can cause colors to pop out of a piece, sometimes to a rather startling extent.

Tone is another name for value , which is one of the elements in art. Sometimes we use the phrase  tonal value , though  shade  can be used as well. No matter what you call it, they all mean the same thing: the lightness or darkness of a color.

Here’s how to make a comic book: Scribble some pictures, fill it with noisy colors and slap in some dialogue. Right? Wrong, says Allen Passalaqua, a comic book color artist who’s worked for DC Comics and Valiant. You can take his word for it — he just pulled an all-nighter obsessing over hues, tints, tones and shades. And he’ll be the first to tell you: This isn’t child’s play.

Peeking behind the scenes might take away the magic of comic books for some, but a comic book can’t exist without all its moving cogwheels — like, say, a gripping plot or a captivating image, says Jim Zub, a comic writer who’s freelanced for Marvel, Hasbro and Cartoon Network, among others. Because if everyone’s done their job right, “you’re caught up in the performance of it all.”

In 1993, a charismatic religious leader captured the attention of the world, as the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms stormed his compound. 

Here’s how to make a comic book: Scribble some pictures, fill it with noisy colors and slap in some dialogue. Right? Wrong, says Allen Passalaqua, a comic book color artist who’s worked for DC Comics and Valiant. You can take his word for it — he just pulled an all-nighter obsessing over hues, tints, tones and shades. And he’ll be the first to tell you: This isn’t child’s play.

Peeking behind the scenes might take away the magic of comic books for some, but a comic book can’t exist without all its moving cogwheels — like, say, a gripping plot or a captivating image, says Jim Zub, a comic writer who’s freelanced for Marvel, Hasbro and Cartoon Network, among others. Because if everyone’s done their job right, “you’re caught up in the performance of it all.”

In 1993, a charismatic religious leader captured the attention of the world, as the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms stormed his compound. 

After a re-watch of The Dark Knight recently it struck me how brilliantly sad it was when The Joker explains to Batman that they’ll “do this dance forever," not only within the context of the narrative but outside of it, as we’d never see Heath Ledger do that dance again. It made me think about those quieter moments in our fan-boy favourites that punch us in the guts and force us to look to the ceiling so our friends don’t spot the tears rolling down our cheeks (I’m looking at you, death-of-Big-Daddy.)


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