CLEVELAND, Ohio – In simpler times, a Harvard educated, tennis-loving magazine writer named John R. Tunis covered sports. He would write about war, hobnob with famous politicians and athletes, and find time to write more than 40 books, mostly geared to young adults. But it's one of his early works, "The Kid from Tomkinsville," that serves as a refreshing read as it approaches its 75 th year of publication.

This story remains far apart from our current trappings of 140-character messages and listicles, in this era of stats-obsessed fans who spend more time gleaning information from ESPN crawlers than from books, it seems.

Tunis' book follows the rookie season of The Kid – Roy Tucker - fresh from a Connecticut small town, where he lived with his grandmother and whose life alternates between working the farm, heading to his job at a drugstore and playing baseball. Tunis frames The Kid alongside teammates who include Dave, an ancient catcher who mentors the willing protégé. The team's, and book's, characters are a colorful lot, including a brash rookie who might be the only character who would translate to a modern-day version of this story.

Cloudflare Ray ID: 3e31842f640d8f33 • Your IP : 62.109.12.231 • Performance & security by Cloudflare

CLEVELAND, Ohio – In simpler times, a Harvard educated, tennis-loving magazine writer named John R. Tunis covered sports. He would write about war, hobnob with famous politicians and athletes, and find time to write more than 40 books, mostly geared to young adults. But it's one of his early works, "The Kid from Tomkinsville," that serves as a refreshing read as it approaches its 75 th year of publication.

This story remains far apart from our current trappings of 140-character messages and listicles, in this era of stats-obsessed fans who spend more time gleaning information from ESPN crawlers than from books, it seems.

Tunis' book follows the rookie season of The Kid – Roy Tucker - fresh from a Connecticut small town, where he lived with his grandmother and whose life alternates between working the farm, heading to his job at a drugstore and playing baseball. Tunis frames The Kid alongside teammates who include Dave, an ancient catcher who mentors the willing protégé. The team's, and book's, characters are a colorful lot, including a brash rookie who might be the only character who would translate to a modern-day version of this story.

CLEVELAND, Ohio – In simpler times, a Harvard educated, tennis-loving magazine writer named John R. Tunis covered sports. He would write about war, hobnob with famous politicians and athletes, and find time to write more than 40 books, mostly geared to young adults. But it's one of his early works, "The Kid from Tomkinsville," that serves as a refreshing read as it approaches its 75 th year of publication.

This story remains far apart from our current trappings of 140-character messages and listicles, in this era of stats-obsessed fans who spend more time gleaning information from ESPN crawlers than from books, it seems.

Tunis' book follows the rookie season of The Kid – Roy Tucker - fresh from a Connecticut small town, where he lived with his grandmother and whose life alternates between working the farm, heading to his job at a drugstore and playing baseball. Tunis frames The Kid alongside teammates who include Dave, an ancient catcher who mentors the willing protégé. The team's, and book's, characters are a colorful lot, including a brash rookie who might be the only character who would translate to a modern-day version of this story.

Cloudflare Ray ID: 3e31842f640d8f33 • Your IP : 62.109.12.231 • Performance & security by Cloudflare

The Kid from Tomkinsville is an amazing book! Roy was just a guy who worked at a drugstore. He loved baseball. The scouts liked him because he was good at baseball. So, they gave him a spot in spring training. It is mind-boggling how much better he gets at baseball after a short amount of time. But then he breaks his arm. Is it the end of his baseball career?

I recommend this book to kids ages 9-13. The whole time I read this book I was so nervous about what was going to happen next. If you like baseball, you will love this book! Find out what else happens by reading the book.

Kid Scoop News is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit and your contributions are tax deductible under FEIN 81-0832367.
© 2018 by Vicki Whiting | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Search | Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest


bookmarkyourlink.info
518p3CyIyEL